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Stuffed Green Banana Fritters, Alcapurrias


They’re not sweet eating bananas nor are they plantains.  They’re what Hispanics, Indians and island people call “green bananas” and they’re heavenly boiled and made into a salad or cooked with root vegetables but everyone’s favorite is the meat stuffed fritter…the alcapurria, pronounced ahl-cah-POO-ree-ah.  Deep fried and savory, this is what we call “un antojo”, a little craving or whim but there is a bit of work involved to make the fritters, well worth every moment spent.  In Puerto Rico alcapurrias are considered street food, found all over the island but especially at the kiosks which line the beaches.  Hot out of the fat, these crunchy fritters will satisfy all and are rich enough to tide one over until the next meal.  My grandmother never made these and they were never served in her house.  This was before the arrival of food processors and, as I mentioned, a tad bit labor intensive.  Plus the green bananas stain everything they touch once peeled, from ones fingers to cutting boards and clothing.  The making of both alcapurrias and pasteles was considered blue-collar work.  So although these dishes are enjoyed during feast days, holidays and beach outings, they  must be ordered in advance if you aren’t willing to make them yourself.  Many home businesses started with women making their own money by preparing pasteles and alcapurrias then either selling them on the street or taking orders in advance.  This year I made the fritters to celebrate Three Kings Day, the sixth of January, a huge holiday in hispanic countries.  Growing up, my family had Christmas in Fort Lauderdale and, the following day, flew down to Puerto Rico to really start the celebration with Mama’s family.  For my older sister, Cynthia, and me those were the days of dollies, tea sets, literature and the occasional treat of an alcapurria.  Feliz Dia de Los Tres Reyes Magos!


  • Difficulty: moderate
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  • 4 ounces cured ham, roughly chopped
  • 1 medium tomato, about 5 ounces, roughly chopped
  • 1 medium onion, about 3 ounces, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 3 sweet chile peppers, seeded and diced
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 packet Sazon seasoning, found in the hispanic section of your grocery store
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 2 tablespoons green olives stuffed with pimento, roughly chopped
  • 1 pound ground beef
  1. Place all the above ingredients except the capers, olives and ground beef in a food processor and pulse until a chunky paste is formed.
  2. Add the ground beef and pulse until ingredients are completely incorporated.
  3. To a large skillet add the ground beef mixture, the capers and olives and brown over medium heat.  Stir while cooking to mix in the capers and olives.
  4. When the meat is completely cooked remove from heat, allow to cool, cover and refrigerate overnight.

Green banana paste (masa):

  1. 10 green bananas, not regular eating bananas or plantains but green cooking bananas
  2. 2 pounds yautia (malanga)
  3. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  4. 2 packets Sazon seasoning
  5. Fill a large bowl halfway with tap water and 2 tablespoons of salt.  Set aside.
  6. Using rubber gloves, score each banana lengthwise three or four times.  Slide your fingernail under the scored peel and remove the entire peel from the banana.  Keep a small paring knife close by to help with any trouble spots.
  7. Drop each peel banana into the salted water and continued until all bananas have been peeled.
  8. Using a vegetable peeler, peel the yautia, rinse under tap water and cut into chunks which will fit your food processor tube.
  9. Fit a food processor with the grating blade which has small holes.
  10. With the motor running continually, grate the bananas and yautia.
  11. Discard the water in the large bowl just used, dry the bowl and transfer the grated contents of the food processor to the bowl.
  12. Fit the food processor with the cutting blade, add the grated mixture, olive oil and the 2 packets of Sazon.  Process until completely smooth.
  13. Spray a small pan with non-stick cooking spray, drop one or two tablespoons of banana mixture and flatten and fry until browned on both sides.  This is to taste for any needed salt of seasoning.  Adjust seasonings accordingly.  It’s good, isn’t it?!
  14. Transfer the banana mixture to a large storage container, cover and refrigerate overnight.
  • vegetable oil to fry
  1. When ready to assemble and fry the fritters, heat one inch of oil in a large frying pan to about 300° or medium high.
  2. Tear a small piece of tin foil or parchment paper into a 5X3″ rectangle and spray lightly with non-stick cooking spray.
  3. Holding the paper in your hand, spoon 3-4 tablespoons of the green banana mixture onto the paper and gently spread it with the back of the spoon into a 4-5″ circle.  Photos are posted below the recipe.
  4. Top the middle of the mixture with 2-3 teaspoons of the ground beef mixture.
  5. Using the back of the spoon, smooth the banana mixture over the meat completely covering it.  Cover any hole with a bit of the banana from the storage container.  The fritter should be the shape of a torpedo without any meat showing through.
  6. Gently slide the fritter into the hot oil and continue shaping the fritters and adding them to the frying pan until the pan is full.  Leave an inch of space between the frying fritters.
  7. Fry the fritters 4-5 minutes and turn them to fry on the other side for 2-3 minutes.
  8. With a slotted spoon, remove the cooked fritters and drain on paper towels.
  9. Continue assembling and frying the fritters until there is no more of the mixtures.
  10. Serve immediately.