All posts by Alicia

Artichoke, Olive and Garlic Tapenade

Every once in a while I say to myself, “You’re not buying anything at the grocery store today.  You just make do with what you have at home.”  And that’s when I come up with some recipes I’m positively crazy about.  Here’s one of them.  You probably have all these ingredients in your pantry and an added bonus is that it comes together in no time flat.  This “dip” is a delight served with cold, crunchy celery sticks.  Served with some whole grain crackers your family won’t be able to stay away.  I found some organic, gluten-free, non-gmo, vegan, black pepper crackers at the grocery store that totally rocked my taste buds.  “Mary’s Gone Crackers”.  Holy moly.  You’d NEVER know they’re so healthful.  And they’re pretty, too.


Spread atop grilled fish or chicken, this tapenade is a natural pleaser as all the flavors marry so darn well.  And guess what else?  It’s pretty low in fat calling for only a couple of tablespoons of olive oil.  I hope you’re not put off by the one anchovy filet.  I promise, scout’s honor (even though I was thrown out of Girl Scouts when I sneaked out of a meeting to call a boy I liked from a phone booth), you will never know the anchovy’s there.  The rinsed, dried filet adds a deeper flavor and after being zipped through the food processor you’ll never even know it was there.  Leave it out and your dip will be flat and one-dimensional so give it a try.  Lemony and garlicky, it travels well to parties and keeps for days in the refrigerator…if it even lasts that long!


Artichoke, Olive and Garlic Tapenade

  • 2 14.5-ounce cans artichoke hearts, well-drained, moisture patted out
  • 1/2 cup green olives, pitted and without pimento
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 1 garlic clove
  • grated zest of one lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 anchovy filet, rinsed and dried
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  1. Place artichoke hearts and olives in a food processor and pulse until slightly chunky with pieces about the size of confetti.  Transfer to mixing bowl.
  2. Add all remaining ingredients to the food processor bowl and pulse until not quite smooth.  You want a bit of texture.
  3. Transfer to bowl with artichokes and olives and mix well.
  4. Serve with raw vegetables and crackers or cover and store in refrigerator until ready to use.

Shrimp and Grits…yes, please

Last week we had a monstrous hurricane bearing down on us and after getting the house and yard storm ready all I could think of was the enormous amount of beautiful dolphin, wild caught shrimp, grass-fed beef and organic chicken lounging in my freezer.  We lose power in our house about the time a storm picks up off the coast of Africa.  It takes nothing for us to lose power.  I hate it.  A car can drive by and all of a sudden, flicker-flicker, and flat silence descends.  No sound, no light, no cooling ceiling fans and no AC.  The worst!  And then, of course, things start thawing and dripping in my freezer.  Not knowing if we would get a direct hit from Hurricane Matthew, and I thank God everyday that we did not, I figured I’d cook up a large portion of my frozen treasures and we would eat like kings for a few days.  Here in south Florida we are blessed with a type of shrimp called Key West Pinks, so sweet, succulent and, yes, pink.  And although their season peaks in June, they’re still quite easy to find in seafood markets.  I quickly steamed a few pounds in a spicy lemony broth and set them aside for us to enjoy cold with cocktail sauce.  I had all kinds of food items in my refrigerator that I was loath to toss.  Bacon, peppers, milk, cream, butter, cheese…what’s a girl to do?


Well, I’ll tell you what this girl did.  I prepared for dinner the most luxurious, creamy dish of Shrimp and  Grits this side of heaven.  I always have grits on hand, good grits.  Slow cooking, stone ground grits.  Not that highly processed, quick or instant, grocery store mess.  All watery and bland.  No.  I like coarsely ground grits, loaded with texture and full of corn flavor that easily stand alone on their own merit.  In fact, these are the grits you almost want to eat without anything on top but then I think of the sweet Pinks.  I daydream of the bacon seasoned sauce puddling on top of creamy, white grits and I’m back on board.  Oh, and by the way, Trader Joe’s store brand grits are really super if you don’t have a grist mill down the street.  The shrimp will be gone in two seconds flat but you’ll probably have some grits left over.   It can be gently warmed again the following day and eaten as is with nothing added but a quick grind of black pepper.  The grits will take about 30 minutes to prepare so don’t start cooking your shrimp until the grits are almost done.  If the grits get too thick it can be thinned out with a little warmed milk, half and half or cream.   Pork is usually included in the shrimp mixture.  Bacon, andouille sausage and Tasso are typically put into service.  My first choice is bacon as its saltiness really brings out the sweetness of the shrimp.  Andouille is good but I find its taste completely overwhelms the delicate flavors of both the shrimp and grits.  Tasso is wonderful but it’s also strong plus can be difficult to find.  This, Gentle Reader, is comfort food at its best.  As there is such a difference in wild caught shrimp versus farmed so is there a vast difference in stone ground grits as opposed to highly processed, quick or instant.   Make the effort to find wild caught shrimp and stone ground grits.  You’ll be positively delighted at the difference they make in your dishes.  I hope you enjoy these two recipes as much as my entire family does.  They’ll do ya proud!

Creamy Grits and's a natural!
Creamy Grits and Collards…it’s a natural!

Shrimp and Grits

  • Servings: 8
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 1 3/4 cups stone ground grits
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 5 1/2 cups water
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  1. In a large, heavy pot bring the water and salt to a boil then reduce the heat to low.
  2. Using a whisk or large wooden spoon, stir the water in a circular motion while slowly pouring in grits and stirring constantly.
  3. When the grits begin to thicken add the milk, cream and butter.  Stir until all the ingredients are incorporated.
  4. Cook over low heat for 30 minutes or until grits are tender, stirring often.
  5. Add the cream cheese and mix until the cheese has melted into the grits.
  6. Cover, set aside and keep warm on low.


  • 5 slices thick sliced bacon, cut into matchstick size pieces
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 large garlic clove, finely minced or grated
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 pounds wild caught uncooked shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1/4 cup cream or half and half
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • serve with Tabasco sauce or Crystal Hot sauce on the side, optional
  1. Place the bacon pieces in a medium size skillet and cook over medium heat until crisp, 6-10 minutes.
  2. Using a slotted spoon, remove the bacon and set aside in a small bowl.  Leave the bacon drippings in the pan.
  3.  To the bacon drippings add the onion, bell pepper and garlic and cook over moderate heat until the onions are clear and soft but not brown, about 5 minutes or so.
  4. Add the butter and stir until melted.  Add the shrimp, lemon juice and white wine.  Stir well to cook evenly.  Cook until shrimp just turn pink.
  5. Quickly add reserved bacon and stir well and remove from heat.
  6. Spoon warm grits in shallow soup bowls.
  7. Using a slotted spoon top grits with shrimp
  8. Pour remaining sauce evenly over shrimp and grits.
  9. Serve immediately.


Pumpkin Tres Leches Bread Pudding


Okay, so I guess I slowly climbed on the pumpkin band wagon.  It’s not the pumpkin flavored coffees at Starbucks.  I can’t stand flavors in my morning coffee…too much like candy and certainly not enough kick.  Nor is it the stand of cinnamon brooms whose scent assaults my olfactory system like a WWII blitzkrieg the moment I step foot in Publix.  No.  It was something as simple as two girl’s weekends, both with girls from college, one was sorority sisters and the other girls that I love.  It got me to thinking about college days.  And Fall.  I went to Mercer University in Macon, Georgia where we had seasons.  That’s where I saw leaves change color for the first time.  I thought how I walked across the beautiful southern campus; orange, yellow and red leaves bouncing and spinning on gusts of wind as if doing cartwheels.  Kind of like sorority sister Anne B. who, drunk and making her way across campus late one night, fell on her face in the middle of a cart-wheel and knocked out her big front tooth.  The whole thing.  Yup.  Serves her right, though.  She was never particularly nice to me plus she had borrowed a very expensive pair of gold earrings and when she finally returned them  to me one had been completely destroyed.  Apparently she had stepped on it.  But she was very, very sorry.  Anyway, where ever she is, she’s running around with a fake front tooth.  Those Autumn nights were chilly for us Florida girls.  In my mind’s eye I can see the wool plaid tweed car coat Daddy had special ordered for me.  A soft, tobacco brown with ebony black and pumpkin gold flecks.  It was sumptuous and luxurious.  Striding across campus to get to class on time, I’d turn the collar up and dig my hands deep into my pockets to stay warm.   In the dorm it was  cozyand comfortable and on weekends music would spill out of our rooms into the halls as we got ready for our dates and went from room to room sharing cocktails before we went out.  Those were the days of albums and turntables.  We listened to everything!  Boz Scaggs, Steely Dan, Marshall Tucker, Allman Brothers, the Eagles, Grinderswitch, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Wet Willie had us singing and dancing like you wouldn’t even believe.  That was our kind of finger poppin’ music.  As I walked out of my dorm with girlfriends or on a date with my boyfriend, you could almost touch the excitement in the darkness, the sensation of anticipation in the frosty, brittle darkness.  Our eyes sparkled from the cold as we laughed, chatted and guzzled booze in the chilly night air.  Fraternity parties were held outdoors on the patio of the lodges.  Mammoth speakers were set up inside and out, as were the kegs and garbage cans filled with grain punch.  More Atlanta Rythym Section, Doobie Brothers and Bachman-Turner Overdrive and Boston.   Lord, I think back and laugh.  Those days celebrated the folly of youth and  the good looks that come with it.  I’ll stop at the risk of divulging any ancient secrets.  But, hey!  Try this way easy bread pudding.  It’s Fall and time for a little pumpkin!


Pumpkin Tres Leches Bread Pudding

  • Servings: 10-12
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 9 cups dense day  old bread. French, challah and brioche are all excellent
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 5 eggs, well beaten
  • 2 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin, plain
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.
  2. Spray a 9X13 pan with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Cut bread into 1″ cubes and place into the baking pan in an even layer.  Drizzle melted butter over the top.
  4. In a large bowl mix the remaining ingredients well, making certain all ingredients are well mixed.  I use a large whisk.
  5. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the cubed bread.
  6. Press the bread down gently to help soak up the egg mixture.  You can use the back of a mixing spoon.  I’ve even used my hands.
  7. Cover and set aside for 15 minutes so the bread absorbs the egg mixture.
  8. Uncover and bake for 50-60 minutes.  Check for doneness at 50 minutes as the baking time depends on the denseness of the bread.
  9. When the top of the bread springs back after being touched the pudding is done.
  10. It can be served warm or cold as is or drizzled with some cream, caramel or chocolate sauce.  Some toasted pecan pecans are nice sprinkled on top of each serving.  The possibilities are almost endless!

Figs Roasted with Honey Goat Cheese and Prosciutto


For me figs are one of the best foods Fall has to offer.  Dark, autumnal and vaguely naughty, they are a seasonal food that is quite literally “here today, gone tomorrow”.  Late summer to fall is their main season and here in south Florida the availability is somewhat unpredictable since they’re trucked in from far away lands.  We try to eat local produce but I’m kind of a fig trollop and I don’t care WHERE they’re from OR who cultivated them.  I love me my figs!  Regardless, this recipe is a wonder blending sweet and salty, spicy heat and creamy coolness.  With a cocktail or two I can easily make this my dinner.  This little savoury is pretty enough for your cocktail party yet sturdy enough for Sunday’s football get-together.  It can be assembled in the morning and baked that afternoon or evening.  In the past I’ve only used chevre, plain goat cheese.  I’ve seen the honeyed goat cheese at my store, Publix, but until now, I’d never tried it.  Gentle Reader, it’s pretty perfect.  Just the right amount of sweetness, between the lush, sexy figs and the salty sharpness of the prosciutto, this hors d’oeuvre will have you rolling your eyes to the back of your head.  Enjoy!



Figs Roasted with Honey Goat Cheese and Prosciutto

  • Servings: approximately 50 pieces
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 4-ounce log of honey goat cheese or plain goat cheese plus 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 pound ripe, fresh figs
  • 1/2 pound prosciutto, thinly sliced…deli thin
  • honey to drizzle
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.
  2. In a small bowl break up goat cheese with a fork, add red pepper flakes and mix well.  Set aside.
  3. With a sharp paring knife or small knife, cut the figs in half vertically, from the stem to the bottom of the fig.
  4. With the tip of the knife dig a small well into the cut side of the center of the fig.  This makes it easier to stuff with the goat cheese.
  5. If the prosciutto has plastic paper in between slices, discard the paper and stack the prosciutto evenly.
  6. Slice the prosciutto lengthwise into even thirds.  You’ll end up with three even stacks of prosciutto strips.
  7.  Fill each fig half with a small amount of goat cheese, maybe a teaspoon or so.  A butter knife makes it quick.
  8. Wrap each stuffed fig half with a strip of prosciutto, wrapping the meat completely around the center and  place on a foil lined baking sheet that has been sprayed lightly with non-stick cooking spray.
  9. Bake for 17-20 minutes or until the prosciutto is crispy.
  10. Place on serving tray and drizzle lightly with honey.
  11. Best served warm.

Honey Butter Dinner Rolls

Why is it no one makes dinner rolls anymore?  I understand the time crunch and lack of energy when you finally get home from work and then have to crank out dinner for the fam but weekends are the perfect time to stock up on these little luxuries that can be stashed away in the freezer to be enjoyed weeks later…maybe some evening when it’s dark, chilly and rainy.  Well, this recipe is one of those kind of keepers.  Soft and fluffy, slathered with warm butter and perhaps a drizzle of that honey you picked up at the farmer’s market, these rolls are a rare treat yet exceptionally easy to make.  They mix and  roll up quickly.  There are two risings but the dough sits quietly in the corner while you go about your business.


The recipe makes 24 rolls so you’ll have plenty of leftovers to freeze, (and they freeze beautifully), or they can be served at breakfast as is or pulled apart and stuffed with a sausage patty or egg.  The slight sweetness of this bread pairs well with a scoop of homemade chicken salad or spicy crab salad served in the opened middle.  With cooler weather right around the corner consider stocking up on these little golden treasures.  You’ll pat yourself on the back for planning so well!


Honey Butter Dinner Rolls

  • Difficulty: easy to moderate
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  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus additional if needed
  • 1 sachet active dry yeast
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted, to brush on before serving
  • 1 tablespoon honey, to brush on before serving
  1. In the bowl of a stand up mixer fitted with  a dough hook combine flour and yeast.
  2. In a small saucepan combine milk, 1/4 cup honey, sugar, 1/4 cup butter and salt, stirring until all ingredients are combined and heated to 105° and 115°.
  3. Add the milk mixture to the flour mixture and beat until just blended.
  4. Add the egg and beat the dough for 3-4 minutes until the dough becomes thick and soft and pulls away from the sides of the bowl.  It will probably be very sticky depending on the humidity in your area.  If the dough is too sticky to handle add one tablespoon of flour to the bowl and beat another minute or so.  If needed add another tablespoon of flour to thicken and continue beating.
  5. Beat the dough until smooth and elastic about 5 minutes.
  6. Place the dough in a greased bowl and turn to grease the top as well.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm corner to rise for 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  8. Lightly spray 2 muffin pans with non-stick cooking spray.
  9. Punch dough down and cut in half with a bench knife or large, sharp knife.  Cover half  of the dough and set aside.
  10. Cut one half of the dough into 12 equal pieces.
  11. Cut each of the 12 pieces into 3 equal pieces, you should have 36 chunks of cut dough.
  12. With your hands gently roll each chunk into a small, fluffy ball and drop three into each muffin cup.
  13. Continue in the same manner with the 2nd half of the dough that was set aside.
  14. Cover both muffin tins and set aside to rise for 45 minutes or until double in size.
  15. Bake in a pre-heated oven for 8-10 minutes or until slightly golden on top.
  16. Remove rolls from the oven and cool for 5 minutes.
  17. Mix the melted butter and tablespoon of honey until well incorporated.  Brush on top of each roll.
  18. Warm any leftovers in a pre-heated 300° oven for 5-7 minutes.

Spiced Greek Saint Bread: Artos

We are a house divided.  Jimmy and James are Greek Orthodox and I am Roman Catholic.  However, I’ve spent a great deal of time in the Greek church and nothing thrills me more than when I discover a new dish.  Several  years back while we were in Boston,  we went to church with  Jimmy’s brother, George.  Jimmy and all his siblings grew up in the cathedral,  with all the big city hustle and bustle of downtown.  All the Greek families grew up in the church.  The church was the religious and social nucleus of the Greek community.  The cathedral’s youth group was enormous.  All the kids went to the church after school and on weekends for pick-up basketball games, church dances and just  to hang out.  It was where most of Jimmy’s friends met their future wives and husbands.  Here we were, years later, and as always, in the church hall after Sunday service.  While my husband and brother-in-law caught up with old friends I strolled the perimeter of the coffee table.  A pretty, little basket caught my eye as it held some sort of coffee cake or bread or maybe it’s cake…I didn’t know but I sure was going  to try it out.  It was life altering.  Chewy on the outside yet moist and yielding on the inside, its mysterious, warm flavors caught me off guard.  Turns out it was a bread called Artos, redolent with the flavors of the Middle East.  At first bite I was reminded of the gifts the Magi offered the Christ child because of the heady fragrance of cinnamon, cloves and ground aniseed.  I had to make it.  I had to!  Well, here it is.  Artos is an easy bread to make but it is a bit messy and does require a little rising time.  Well worth it if you ask me.  The recipe can be doubled and I feel you may as well make two then you can give one to a friend or someone special.  The recipe is adapted from Anissa Helou’s book “Savory Baking From the Mediterranean”.  The bread is fabulous with almond butter or Nutella accompanied by a cup of tea or coffee.  It’s great as breakfast or as a snack and is fabulous as  sandwich sliced, stuffed with bananas and nut butters then grilled.  Try it.  You’ll amaze yourself!


Spiced Greek Saint Bread, Artos

  • Difficulty: moderate
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  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2 packages active dry yeast, (4 1/2 teaspoons)
  • 3 1/3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour plus additional for kneading and shaping
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • grated zest of 1 large orange, I use navels
  • 2 tablespoons ground aniseed
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus additional to grease pan
  • 2 tablespoons good red wine, (You know you have a bottle open!)
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons white sesame seeds, optional
  1. Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup warm water, stir until creamy and set aside to “foam”.
  2. In a large bowl combine flour, salt, sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, cloves and aniseed and make a well in the center.
  3. To the well add the 2 tablespoons olive oil, red wine and 3/4 cup warm water and mix well.  The dough will be quite wet and sticky.  That’s fine.
  4. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set in a warm corner of your kitchen to rise for 1 hour or.
  5. Grease a deep 9-inch round baking dish making sure to cover the entire rim as well.  If using sesame seeds sprinkle 1/2 evenly over the bottom of the pan.
  6. Cover a thick layer of flour over a work surface, wet your hands with water or olive oil and transfer the dough to the work surface.
  7. Pick up the top edges of the dough and fold them toward the middle.  Do the same with the bottom.
  8. QUICKLY pick up the dough and plop it seam side down into the waiting baking pan.
  9. Gently even out the dough by patting it
  10. Wet hands again and spread more water evenly over the entire surface.
  11. If using sesame seeds sprinkle the remaining half over the top of the dough.
  12. Spray a sheet of plastic wrap with non-stick spray, loosely cover the dough and set aside to rise for 1 hour or until double in bulk.
  13. Pre-heat oven to 375°.
  14. Uncover the bread and bake for 20 minutes.
  15. Reduce the heat to 350° and bake for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown all over.
  16. Cool on a wire rack.

Crab Cakes, the real deal

These sweet yet salty crab cakes are every crab lovers dream.  How many times have we gone to a shi-shi restaurant and hopefully ordered crab cakes which should be crunchy and buttery on the  outside, pearly white, sweet but briny on the inside only to be served a couple of heavily doctored, gluey, deep-fried, fish-like patties?  Gosh, I hate it when that happens.  So many restaurants trash seafood, from overcooked tiles of fish or rubbery, heavily breaded fried shrimp to our loved crab.  It was different when we were growing up here in Lauderdale.  As a child, there wasn’t the selection of dining spots we now have available.  Our grandfather, Grandpa, had moved here from Cleveland when our grandmother passed away.  He, too, lived on the water and loved to throw out a dozen or so crab cages.  Every two or three days he’d let me walk down to the canal with him and pull up the cages.  Each cage had small, round floater tied with a piece of monofilament making it easy to haul up the cages and check our catch.  Every crab cage had been baited with either pieces of mullet, their heads, bodies and tails, or raw chicken necks.  I loved everything about it!

Dad and Grandpa on the dock a thousand years ago!
Dad and Grandpa on the dock a thousand years ago!

After strolling down to the water’s edge I would lie on my stomach on the dock while Grandpa pulled up  the heavy metal cages.  My job was to tell him if we had caught anything.  If we had he’d continue pulling, if not he’d drop the heavy box back down to the muddy depths of the canal.  Most of the time, though, there were sweet, luscious blue crabs.  We’d throw our haul into waiting plastic buckets, always being careful not to get pinched, then walk back to his apartment where Grandpa would spend the rest of the morning picking the crabs.  I wasn’t allowed because I guess my parents thought I’d cut myself with a knife…and I probably would have.  The waters were clear back then and the meat that came out of those crabs was the sweetest I’ve ever had.  Grandpa made a gorgeous crab salad and his bisque was magnificent.


I’m sharing with you my recipe for crab cakes.  I think they’re fabulous and they taste of crab…nothing else.  No crackers, mashed potatoes or breadcrumbs mixed in.  No fillers here.  The Panko crumbs and butter make a light and crispy coating allowing the crab meat to positively shine.  Serve with a homemade remoulade sauce or simply with freshly cut lime wedges but either way I hope you enjoy them!


Crab Cakes

  • Servings: 6 crab cakes
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 1 pound lump crab meat, picked over and cleaned, liquid squeezed out by hand
  • 1 scallion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 -1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 1/2 cups Panko breadcrumbs, unseasoned
  • 4 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  1. Place cleaned and drained crab meat gently in a medium size bowl.
  2. In a small bowl combine scallion, cayenne pepper, salt, black pepper and egg.  Mix well so all ingredients are completely combined.
  3. Pour egg mixture evenly over crab meat and gently toss crab by hand to combine but take care not to break up lumps of meat.
  4. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of flour over the crab and toss carefully by hand to mix.  Sprinkle the second tablespoon of flour, toss carefully and repeat with the remaining tablespoon of flour.
  5. Using a 1/3-cup measuring cup, scoop 6 firmly packed portions and place on a small baking sheet or dinner plate.  Packing them firmly helps them to keep their shape.
  6. Place the Panko in a shallow bowl (I use a shallow soup bowl).
  7. Carefully place a crab cake in the bread crumbs, coat the top of the cake with Panko and gently pat into place.  This will cause the bottom also to be covered with crumbs.
  8. Place back onto tray or plate and continue dredging all the crab cakes.
  9. Line a clean plate with paper towels to drain cooked crab cakes and set aside.
  10. Heat a large frying pan or skillet over medium heat with half the butter and half the olive oil.
  11. Place three of the cakes in the pan and cook until golden brown, about 3-4 minutes.  Carefully turn each crab cake over, cover pan and cook for another 3-4 minutes.
  12. Transfer cooked crab cakes to the paper towel lined plate, add the remaining butter and olive oil to the pan and cook the other three crab cakes in the same manner.
  13. Serve immediately.