Tag Archives: citrus

100% Whole Wheat, Orange, Nut and Olive Oil Biscotti

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Winter in Florida means citrus…jacked up citrus.  It’s the season for heavy with juice, dimple skinned, brilliantly colored oranges, lemons, limes and kumquats all begging to be juiced, baked or eaten out of hand.  I had a hankering for a crunchy dunking cookie and this is the end result.  I debated whether to drizzle a little icing or dark chocolate over the tops, both go so well with orange, but I opted for neither and went for a more European, unadorned cookie.  And healthful.  No white flour allowed today.  In working with the recipe I used pecans in some batches and walnuts in others.  Both are excellent but only if toasted prior to baking otherwise the nuts are bland and lost in the biscotti.  It’s a simple recipe and easy.

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As I’ve written in other posts, I strongly, strongly suggest using parchment paper to line your baking sheet.   It can be found at the grocery store but the paper is in a roll like tin foil or wax paper which makes it tricky to work with.  The ends of the paper curl imitating the roll in the box.  Flat sheets are found in many food warehouses and are much, much cheaper.  Leave them to cool completely before storing them and the cookies will remain crisp.  Dunk in a cup of coffee, hot tea or a glass of milk for a satisfying treat.

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100% Whole Wheat, Orange, Nut and Olive Oil Biscotti

  • Servings: approximately 50 biscotti
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 3 cups whole wheat pastry flour + extra to shape the dough
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt, a pinch
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons grated orange zest
  • 2 tablespoons orange liqueur, optional
  • 2 teaspoons orange oil or extract
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped, toasted walnuts or pecans
  1. Pre-heat oven to 300°.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a medium bowl mix flour, baking powder and salt until completely combined.  Set aside.
  3. In the bowl of a standup mixer add the eggs and, with the paddle attachment, beat the eggs until broken up.
  4. To the eggs add the sugar and olive oil and mix until well combined.
  5. Add to the egg mixture the orange zest, liqueur if using, orange oil or extract, vanilla and mix until completely combined and the orange zest is evenly mixed through and not in clumps.
  6. Add the flour mixture and nuts to the egg mixture and slowly beat until all ingredients are well mixed and there are no wet spots on the bottom of the bowl.  The dough will be heavy and sticky.
  7. Sprinkle flour on the counter and on your hands, divide the dough in half and roll each half into logs measuring about 14″X3″X1″.
  8. Transfer to baking sheet lined with parchment paper leaving 2 inches between the logs.
  9. Bake for 30 minutes then remove from oven and let cool 10-15 minutes.
  10. Move one log to a cutting board and, using a serrated knife, cut each log diagonally into 1/4 inch cookies.  Place cut cookies back on baking sheet cut side up.  Slice the second log in the same manner.
  11. Return baking sheet to the oven and bake 30 minutes, turning over cookies after 15 minutes of baking.
  12. Allow cookies to cool completely before storing.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

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Citrus and Coconut Vinaigrette, your new favorite summer salad dressing

This is the summer of counting my blessings.  It’s a stay-at-home kind of summer.  And that’s okay!  I recently found myself thinking, “I wish we could go someplace a little bit cooler.  Eat buckets of rich food and wash it down with gallons of local wine.  Maybe do a bit of shopping after seeing the sights…”.  There were loud notes of complaint in that daydream and I had to remind myself that I am darn fortunate exactly where I am.  Even if it’s not the most exciting place.  Mama taught me that lesson a very long time ago; a lesson she learned when she was a little girl in Puerto Rico.  My mother’s family lived in a town called Fajardo, pronounced fah-HAR-do, on an enormous piece of land my grandfather inherited from his father who, in turn, inherited it from his father, etcetera, etcetera.  Mama had four sisters and five brothers and her mother ran a smooth household.  My grandfather, whom we affectionately called “Papa Pepe”, tolerated no misbehavior from my uncles although they all had near fatal adventures never known to him.  The boys all had their own horses and rode through the fields and stream on their land.  They chased animals, had races, swam, played Zorro and indulged in all usual hijinks of young boys.

My uncle, Tio Hector, playing Zorro. He was 17 at the time.
My uncle, Tio Hector, playing Zorro. He was 17 at the time.

The girls, on the other hand, were almost housebound.  My mother and aunts could read and do needlework.  They played with china dolls, sang songs and made up skits under the shade of mahogany trees.  One day my mother found herself standing alone in the house, looking out of a large window onto a splendid meadow.  Mama said the sun was shining, the grasses were green and there were butterflies.  Under the butterflies was a little boy, dancing and skipping, the happiest ever.  It was Miguelito, the youngest of Pedro, my grandfather’s driver, and Angelina, who helped my grandmother with the children.  My mother was  entranced….such freedom…such happiness!  Standing at the window she thought, “Oh, how I wish I was Miguelito!”.  She stayed looking out of the window until long after he was gone.  When suddenly came Miguelito’s mother, Angelina flying around the corner of the house, leather belt in hand, all the while roaring, “Miguelito! Ven aca!  Te voy a dar!  Miguelito!”, “Get over here! You’re gonna get it!”.  Crystal clear was the realization Mama had at exactly that moment that you never know what life has for you or anyone at any given moment.  Life can change on a dime.  She was practically limp with relief that she wasn’t, and never would be, that little boy, Miguelito,  whose happiness would end as soon as the leather belt his mother was waving around struck his scrawny legs.  This was what I told myself when I started grousing about not going away for the summer.  This was what I told myself when I whined about not being in Greece or France or England.  I quickly reminded myself of the beautiful neighborhood I live in and see every morning when I workout.  I thought of afternoon dips in our pool, wearing flip-flops every waking moment of the day, summer hours with girlfriends and cool drinks and foods we savor day in and day out.  No.  I’m blessed beyond belief that I have all this and more.  I’m happy to munch on mountains of cold, crisp salads, refreshing myself with tervis tumbler after tervis tumbler packed with ice and coconut water and doing this in my beautiful home.  Because life is very, very good.

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This salad dressing is a marvel.  Whether it’s plain field greens you are dressing or the combination of arugula and shaved fennel, this dressing will be a summer favorite.  The coconut oil will solidify as it is kept  in the refrigerator so I portion out the amount I’ll be using when I want it.  I allow it to come to room temperature on the counter or gently zap it in the microwave to liquify the coconut oil.  The dressing may be prepared with fresh orange and lemon juice or with just fresh lemon juice.  It is extremely thin and runny but somehow works really well.  The citrus is like a tonic and the coconut  oil gives the dressing a sweet smoothness like no other oil.  Every night I heap this salad on my dinner plate and I am happy, happy.  Hope you like it!

Citrus and Coconut Vinaigrette

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 2 navel oranges, juiced
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil, can be found at the grocery store
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Combine all ingredients in blender or magic bullet and blend until smooth.
  2. Taste for any needed salt or pepper and adjust as needed.
  3. Bring to room temperature to liquify coconut oil before serving.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Key Lime Pound Cake…one year later

Thanks architec TSP for making a lightweight whisk that produces a gorgeous, runny icing!
Thanks architec TSP for making a lightweight whisk that produces a gorgeous, creamy icing!

This cake.  One year later this cake is making a resurgence.  I never dreamed it would be so popular; it was viewed and shared by thousands all over the world.  I posted it as an applaud to my older sister, Cynthia, on her birthday.  The older we get the crazier I am about her.  We’ve both changed over the years; we’ve each had our triumphs and struggles but this cake need not change.  I baked it so many times…just yesterday for my life-long friend, Andrea, who had a rather important birthday to celebrate.  Our birthdays are a week and a half apart so we’re almost twins.  Our families lived one street away from each other, her brother and sisters went to school with my brother and sisters.  One of my earliest memories of Ange was when we were in 2nd or 3rd grade at East Side Elementary School.  Our teacher told us to take out our spelling books, a thin volume sporting a gray cover with stick people moving about happily and with purpose.  I clearly remember being pleased because spelling was one of my few strong suits.  The teacher droned on, “Class, please open your books to page…”, when all of a sudden, whoosh!  BLEAH!  From somewhere inside of me came an explosion of  vomit splattering all over my favorite text-book.  Banished to the infirmary I remember passing a woman from the janitorial staff in the hallway and feeling horrible that she had to clean up some little girl’s mess.  In the infirmary I lay on my bed, bored stiff and somewhat bothered, waiting for Mama to come pick me up.  I would be there quite a while as Mama was always notoriously late and it was so unnecessary as I felt fine.  Staring at the ceiling I let my thoughts drift when I realized there was a tapping sound being made.  More like a light knock and it was coming from the cubicle next to mine.  I whispered, “Who is it?”.  “It’s Andrea!”, she whispered back.  On tiptoe I excitedly stood up on the bed and peered over the metal divider wall.  There she was, scrawny ol’ Ange grinning right back up at me.  “What are ya doin’?”, I asked.  “Nothin’.”, she replied.  “Ya wanna jump on the beds?”, I asked.  With a twinkle in her eye she popped right up and answered, “YEAH!”.  And so we did.  Up and down we bounced and twirled, singing little songs and giggling until Mama came.  As we walked out I heard Andrea say to Miss Pickrell, the principal’s secretary, “I feel better now, Miss Pickrell, so I’m just gonna go back to class.”  “Okay, honey!” was all the secretary said.  And that’s how it’s always been.  Andrea is a strong and golden ray of sunshine in my life.  Always has been, always will be.  I make her laugh, she makes me laugh.   We tell each other how beautiful and sexy we are and, really, we are.  We wear hats…and well.  We lunch regularly.  Together we live the words, “I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.”  To my fellow Pisces, my sister mermaid, on this, your 60th birthday, I send you love, laughter and Key Lime Pound Cake.

Key Lime Pound Cake with Key Lime Cream Cheese Icing


  •  4 sticks butter, that’s 1 pound, room temperature
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 6 large eggs, room temperature
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup fresh key lime juice
  • 1/4 cup evaporated milk, (I always keep a good number of those small, 5 ounce cans in my pantry.)
  • 4 teaspoons key lime zest, minced
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  1. Pre-heat oven to 300°.  Cover inside of 10 inch tube pan with non-stick spray.  My pan is 10  1/2″ and it’s just fine.  Set aside.
  2. Using a stand-up mixer or electric hand-held, beat the butter well until light in color and fluffy.  Add the sugar and again beat well for at least 5 minutes.  I use a stand up mixer and beat the mixture 10-15 minutes.  I don’t like a “grainy” cake.
  3. One at a time add the eggs and beat only until the yellow disappears.
  4. Stir juice, milk, zest and vanilla together.
  5. Now mixing by hand, gradually flour to the butter-egg mixture alternating with the key lime juice and milk mixture.  Begin and end with flour.  Mix well but just enough to incorporate all ingredients.  You don’t want a tough pound cake!
  6. Pour evenly into the tube pan and tap pan on the counter to loosen any air bubbles.
  7. Bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  8. Cool on a cooling rack for 15-20 minutes in the pan then transfer from pan to cooling rack and allow to cool another hour or until completely cool.

The cake is far better the following day or 2 days later.

Key Lime Cream Cheese Icing

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 3-4 tablespoons butter, room temperature
  • 4 cups confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed key lime juice
  • 2-3 teaspoons key lime zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  1. Using a hand mixer beat cream cheese and butter in a large bowl until well mixed.
  2. Add confectioner’s sugar and beat well until completely smooth and fluffy.
  3. Add key lime juice, zest and vanilla and mix until all ingredients are incorporated.
  4. Ice cake.

This makes quite a bit of icing.  It’s runny and creamy, smooth and sweet but with the tartness we’ve all come to love and expect from Key Limes.  If you’re in an area where Key Limes are not available they’re easily replaced with 2/3 parts fresh lime juice and 1/3 part fresh lemon juice. After icing the entire  pound cake I fill the middle hole with the excess icing.  When the cake is served icing can be taken from the middle and dolloped along the side the slice of cake.  Or, as in the photos, the leftover icing can be served on the side in a pretty, little bowl.

Key Lime Shortbread Cookies with Key Lime Glaze…it’s Daddy’s 93rd!

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If it’s October then it’s time to celebrate my father’s birthday…his 93rd birthday this year!  This past year has been kind of hard on him; Mom died last November and Dad has slowed down considerably.  Well, for him anyway.  We still go to our chosen outdoor organic market one town over every Saturday morning.  I treasure those mornings.  Each trip, even during the week to the grocery store, I learn something about him.  From the mundane minutiae to the spectacular.  And laugh?  Oh, do we laugh!  Here’s an inside fact about Dad that even some of his closest friends didn’t know.  And I don’t have to be concerned that Daddy might find out; he’s internet savvy but has no interest at all in reading my blog.  His feeling is “Once you’ve seen one church or museum, you’ve seen them all.”  Whaaaat?  I tell him, “Dad!  It’s a cooking blog.” And he always responds, “No, I’m not interested!”.  Although Dad is a thin as a rail and a vegetarian, his resolve and self-discipline is weak as a baby when it comes to sweets.  There…it’s out.  Bake him a pie, some cookies or some sort of crisp or crumble and he will protest vehemently because he knows what’s coming.  The following day, after taking possession of the unwelcome sweet he’ll call and in a defeated tone, and it’s always the same, he’ll say, “Vishinsky, you’re not going to believe this.  I had my dinner and thought I’d have a slice of that pie you dropped off.  I really liked it so I thought I’d have another piece…not a big one just a little piece.  So I did.  Then I thought, “Well, I can have another taste.  And you know what happened, Vishinsky?”.  And that’s my cue to answer,  “Oh no, Dad.  What happened?”.  He always answers the same way, “You know what happened.  You KNOW what happened!  I ate the whole thing.  I felt sick, SICK, afterwards.  Sick.  I’m never eating pie again.  Ever!  So don’t make me any.  Don’t make me anything.  I’ve sworn off all sugar.  Really.  I mean it.”  But he doesn’t.  I’ll go back with a blueberry cobbler or peach tart and his eyes will light up.  “Just leave it on the counter.  I’ll have some after lunch.  Thanks, Vishinsky, that’s great!”  And since he never reads my blog, I’ll tell y’all something else.  Sometimes I lie to him and tell him there’s no sugar in the, say cobbler, nope, no sugar at all.  “Just a little honey, Dad.  Greek Thyme honey, Dad, from the mountains of Greece.  You’ll like it!”  I feel he could use a bit of weight. Sweet Jesus, he only weighs about 120 pounds and that’s way too thin.  So what’s a little sugar and butter?

Happy Birthday, Dad! Look! You have all your precious children around you!!
Happy Birthday, Dad! Look! You have all your precious children around you!!

So for this birthday he received a homemade sweet potato bread, a blueberry cobbler, four dark chocolate bars from Whole Foods and the following Key Lime Shortbread cookies with Key Lime Glaze.  He loved them all and hasn’t gotten sick yet.  Happy Birthday, Jungle Jack!

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Key Lime Shortbread Cookies with Key Lime Glaze

  • Servings: approximately 35 cookies
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 3/4 pounds butter, (3 sticks), room temperature
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Key Lime zest
  • 1 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/4 cup Key Lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour

Key Lime Glaze

  • 3/4 cup confectioner’s sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Key Lime juice
  • pinch of salt
  1. Pre-heat oven to 325°.
  2. In a food processor pulse granulated sugar and Key Lime zest until the pieces of zest are small, about the size of a grain of short grain rice.  This can also be done by hand on a cutting board mincing the zest with the sugar.  Set aside.
  3. Using a large bowl and hand mixer beat butter until light and fluffy.
  4. Add granulated sugar/key lime mixture to the butter and mix well.
  5. Add the confectioner’s sugar, Key Lime juice, vanilla and salt and mix well.
  6. By hand gently fold in flour and incorporate just until the flour is mixed in.
  7. Transfer dough to plastic wrap and shape into a log roughly 18″ long.  Wrap well and chill in the refrigerator for at least one hour or until firm.
  8. Slice into rounds 1/4″-1/2″ thick and place on parchment lined baking sheet 1″ apart.
  9. Bake 22-25 minutes or until barely golden on the edges.
  10. Cool 10 minutes on baking sheet then transfer cookies to cooling rack.
  11. While cookies are cooling place all ingredients for the glaze in a small bowl and mix until the sugar and salt have completely dissolved.
  12. Put about 1 teaspoon of glaze in the middle of the cooled cookies and, using the back of a spoon, swirl the glaze covering the top of the cookie.  Place on cooling racks set over baking sheets and let glaze set and harden to touch.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

 

Sweet Poached Blood Oranges over Greek Yoghurt Cake

IMG_8922 Blood oranges.  Succulent, fleshy and juicy blood oranges are such an indulgence that when I saw them I knew in my heart of hearts I had to take them home.  I was at the market Dad and I go to every Saturday morning when I saw them on display front and center.  Although we’re in Florida, blood oranges are not easily found.  Grocery stores never carry them and even farmer’s markets are not wont to make them readily available.  So when I stumbled upon them I doubled bagged and loaded up.  I would figure out what I wanted to do with them later.  Back at the house I let my wander on the different dishes I’d had that included citrus.  Topping the list were two; sweet, poached blood oranges over a Greek cake with yoghurt and homemade rice pudding with nuggets of the fruit in a glossy syrup of blood orange juice.  First I went for the cake.  I have a basic cake recipe that I use often from Susanna Hoffman’s cookbook “The Olive and Caper” which is perfect for showcasing citrus.  It is a simple, dense and satisfying cake which can easily be served by itself in wedges, eaten out of hand and always delights those who share it.  Or it can be topped with fruits, syrup or icing.  Either way it’s a great workhorse in your stable of desserts.  It is one of those cakes which is better the following day.  Later I decided to also candy some smaller pieces of oranges in lots of glistening syrup, make some individual Greek rice puddings and share them with my Greek school classmates.  Next week is our last class of the year and we always bring treats to celebrate the upcoming summer break.  So let’s get to it! IMG_8951

Sweet Poached Blood Oranges over Greek Yoghurt Cake

  • Servings: 12-16
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Sweet Poached Blood Oranges

  • 2 blood or navel oranges, cut into 1/8″ slices, discard end pieces
  • 1 lemon, cut into 1/8″ slices, discard end pieces
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 cup cool water

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  1. Over medium heat put sugar and water in a medium pot.  Stir until the sugar just dissolves then do NOT stir again or the syrup will form crystals and not turn out right.
  2. Gently slide in orange and lemon slices and softly press down so the fruit is completely covered by the syrup.  If the fruit keeps floating back to the top place a small, heat-proof plate on top as a weight.
  3. Simmer softly for 20 minutes of until the edges of the fruit are becoming translucent.
  4. With a slotted spoon remove fruit and place on a tray lined with parchment paper to cool.  Discard cinnamon stick and set syrup aside to use later.
  5. Line 10″ cake pan with parchment paper making certain to line the entire pan including sides.  Very important so the cake comes out of the pan clean.
  6. Arrange the fruit slices on the parchment paper in the pan slightly overlapping until the entire bottom of the pan is covered.  Remember, this is going to be the top of your cake so make it as pretty as you like.
  7. Set aside until cake batter is ready.

Yoghurt Cake

  • 8 tablespoons butter (1 stick), room temperature
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 4 large eggs, separated
  • 1 cup plain Greek yoghurt
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • pinch of salt

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  1. Preheat oven of 350°F.
  2. Combine the butter and sugar in a large bowl and beat with an electric mixer until creamy.
  3. Beat in the egg yolks all at once, then the yoghurt and zest.
  4. In another bowl, mix the flour, baking powder and salt together, then sift them into the bowl with yoghurt mixture.  Beat to mix well.
  5. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  6. Whisk half the whites into the batter mixture, then gently fold in the remaining whites.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan and bake until a tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean and the edges of the cake are pulling away from the edges of the pan, about 45 minutes.  Transfer the pan to a wire rack to cool.
  8. When the cake is cool, place your serving platter over the cake, invert and unmold it.  Gently peel off parchment paper.
  9. Brush or spoon fruit syrup over orange slices.  If you wish, reserve a bit of syrup to drizzle over individual slices or whipped cream when serving.
  10. Set aside for at least one hour before serving.
  11. The cake will keep for several days, covered and stored at room temperature.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Key Lime Pound Cake with Key Lime Cream Cheese Icing…omg!

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Next week is my older sister Cynthia’s birthday.  She was my first friend, my first confidante and my first co-conspirator.  She loved tennis and french, classical music and fashion.  She was the best big sister.  She watched out for me and was always there for me especially when I went through my “wild” stage.  She never judged and has unfailingly given me the best advice she could our whole lives together.  We share the early years in Puerto Rico before Tommy and Pamela were born.  We shared Crayola crayons while coloring and spent hours playing “little dolls”.  While in college the clouds of cigarette smoke billowing out of her bedroom were epic during our late night girl-talkathons.

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Here she is circa 1974 after a tennis match and cooling dip in the pool.  Slender, feminine and a helluva flirt she drove her college beaus mad.  Today we both have a passion for books and the sophisticated appointment of rooms.  Pearls thrill us beyond measure.  And she has a thing for lemon cakes (but she calls them “lemon kuchens”).  “Kuchen” being cake in German.  Every single time she comes home to Fort Lauderdale, which is three or four times a year, she’ll ask me, “How ’bout that lemon kuchen? and I always answer, “What about it?”.  I answer that way because I once baked her a lemon pound cake, from scratch, and ultimately she never had any because she never made time during that trip to come over to my house.  So no more lemon kuchen!  Until now.  I’ve been on a pound cake kick, not surprising when you see my girth.  I’m certain I’ve gained at  least 4 pounds since I started on this mission.  I craved… no, lusted after a dense, lemony-bright, tart and rich pound cake topped with a crown of smooth, creamy citrus icing.  As you can well imagine the development process has been a short visit to Dante’s fifth hell.  Not.  Also, here in South Florida, it’s key lime season and I would venture to say that here in this tropical end of the state, key lime cake comes in close right after key lime pie in popularity.

Creamy yellow is the shade you want in a key lime. In this case big is better. Look for limes the size of ping-pong balls.
Creamy yellow is the shade you want in a key lime. In this case big is better. Look for limes the size of ping-pong balls.
I participated in a one day travel writing class downtown and took these slices to suck up. It worked. It’s the miracle cake.

 

I was lucky enough to have a plethora of key limes given to me and have juiced and zested my fingers down to the bone.  Consequently long after the season is over I will have juice and zest safely tucked away in my freezer portioned out and labeled rendering me capable of baking great quantities of my new favorite pound cake.  This cake bakes up beautifully.  It would make an exquisite wedding cake, the icing decorated with the dramatic “pop” of fresh blackberries or raspberries.  On the other end of the “pretty” spectrum around the “practical” end James mentioned to me in passing me that for the past several days he has had a thick wedge for breakfast.  I’m telling you people, you cannot stay away from this cake.  It’ll sing out to you from the next room.  It’s the devil.  And if loving it is wrong, I don’t want to be right.  Yes, the cake is sweet, however the substantial addition of lime zest propels it to a new world of citrus wonder.  The crumb is heavy and dense, incredibly moist while at the same time smooth and somehow almost weightless.  The icing is a recipe in richness.  The cream cheese works in tandem with the lemon to make a “dolce-crostata”, or sweet-tart heaven in your mouth.  That being the case I look forward to having a key lime cake baked the next time Cynthia comes down for all of us to delight in and savor.  Happy, happy birthday, sweet sister.

Key Lime Pound Cake with Key Lime Cream Cheese Icing

  • Servings: one 10
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

  •  4 sticks butter, that’s 1 pound, room temperature
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 6 large eggs, room temperature
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup fresh key lime juice
  • 1/4 cup evaporated milk, (I always keep a good number of those small, 5 ounce cans in my pantry.)
  • 4 teaspoons key lime zest, minced
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  1. Preheat oven to 300°.  Cover inside of 10 inch tube pan with non-stick spray.  My pan is 10  1/2″ and it’s just fine.  Set aside.
  2. Using a stand-up mixer or electric hand-held, beat the butter well until light in color and fluffy.  Add the sugar and again beat well for at least 5 minutes.  I use a stand up mixer and beat the mixture 10-15 minutes.  I don’t like a “grainy” cake.
  3. One at a time add the eggs and beat only until the yellow disappears.
  4. Stir juice, milk, zest and vanilla together.
  5. Now mixing by hand, gradually flour to the butter-egg mixture alternating with the key lime juice and milk mixture.  Begin and end with flour.  Mix well but just enough to incorporate all ingredients.  You don’t want a tough pound cake!
  6. Pour evenly into the tube pan and tap pan on the counter to loosen any air bubbles.
  7. Bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  8. Cool on a cooling rack for 20-25 minutes in the pan then transfer from pan to cooling rack and allow to cool another hour or until completely cool.

The cake is far better the following day or 2 days later.

Key Lime Cream Cheese Icing

  • 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 3-4 tablespoons butter, room temperature
  • 4 cups confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed key lime juice
  • 2-3 teaspoons key lime zest
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  1. Using a hand mixer beat cream cheese and butter in a large bowl until well mixed.
  2. Add confectioner’s sugar and beat well until completely smooth and fluffy.
  3. Add key lime juice, zest and vanilla and mix until all ingredients are incorporated.
  4. Ice cake.

This makes quite a bit of icing.  After icing the entire  pound cake I fill the middle hole with the excess icing.  When the cake is served icing can be taken from the middle and dolloped along the side the slice of cake.

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