Category Archives: Breads

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

Ever wondered why restaurant whole wheat pizza always tastes better?  And why the at-home whole wheat pizza comes out of the oven hard and brittle, stony enough to break off a front tooth?  Well, last night I finally figured it out.  And let me say, the answer is not more olive oil in the dough.  No.  It’s the combination of two things…a little bit of white all-purpose flour mixed into the whole wheat flour and more water than you would think makes sense.  You would have thought I’d have figured this out by now.  I’ve only been making pizza at home for years now but I confess.  Every time I made whole wheat pizza using only whole wheat flour it came out hard as a flat brick.  I strove for a crisp crust with a chewy center while maintaining a relatively healthful dinner.  These pizzas were made palatable with generous toppings of turkey pepperoni, arugula or spinach and the great compromise of 2% reduced fat mozzarella.  Finally I just stopped preparing pizza altogether.  Months and months went by without it being served at our house.  But last night I had a hankering for it and, by gosh, I was going to get it right.  It had been such a long time since I had mixed up the dough that I couldn’t remember the recipe I had cobbled together and, boy, was THAT liberating.  I felt such freedom not having any rules or even any do’s or don’ts to follow.  I had escaped the confines of the culinary box I’d been living in!

I began in the afternoon with a free-flow of ideas and hunches rattling  around my brain.  Two thoughts remained front and center. 1.  White flour is produces a soft and tender product.  2.  Enough water will produce a sticky, floppy dough that won’t dry out.  After a few tries I believe I nailed it.  And the beauty of this dough is it’s so wet and unmanageable it can be mixed in a bowl with a spoon thus eliminating any kneading and messing up of your counter tops.  Life’s small blessings.  In any case, I sure hope you try this recipe out.  Look at it this way, whole wheat flour, turkey pepperoni and greens make for a more healthful pizza which means you can eat it more often!

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • Servings: two 12 inch pizzas
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 package or 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 1/4 cup warm water, tap is fine, no more than 115°
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon honey or agave
  • 1 3/4 cups whole wheat flour, plus additional to flour baking sheet etc.
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • cornmeal
  1. 1 hour prior to baking, pre-heat oven to 500°.
  2. In a large bowl mix all-purpose flour, yeast and warm water.  A wooden spoon works best.  You’ll a few have some lumps of flour but they’ll work their way out when you mix in the whole wheat flour.
  3. Add 3 tablespoons of olive oil and honey/agave to the mixture and combine well.
  4. Add 1 3/4 cups whole wheat flour and salt and mix well until all the lumps are gone.
  5. Cover with plastic wrap, place in a warm corner and allow to rise for 45-60 minutes or until double in size.  Now is a good time to pre-heat your oven.
  6. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and gather the dough into a ball while still in the bowl.  If you don’t have a bench scraper you can cut in half the plastic top of an oatmeal can then cut off the rim or use a butter knife that’s been covered with a bit of olive oil.
  7. Cut the dough in half and using the bench scraper or butter knife, push the sides of each ball of dough into rounds.  To keep the dough from sticking, dust the rounds and bowl with some whole wheat flour using as little as possible.  The wetter the dough, the more chewy the pizza.
  8. Dust your hands and a baking sheet or pizza paddle with a good handful of cornmeal and quickly transfer one dough round to the center of the baking sheet.
  9. Gently pat out the round, moving the round on the cornmeal to avoid it sticking to the baking sheet, until you have an 11″ to 12″ pizza.  If you prefer a thicker crust make the pizza smaller.
  10. Top the pizza with the sauce of your choice then add your toppings.
  11. Bake 15-20 minutes or until the crust is golden brown.
  12. Allow to cool 4-5 minutes before slicing.
  13. Serve immediately.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

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Southern Buttermilk Biscuits

Nothing says southern hospitality more than hot biscuit straight out the oven, especially when you have a house full of people.  Buttery and fragrant, these biscuit can be the foundation of a great southern breakfast.  They’re not the easiest…then again, I wouldn’t say they’re hard to make either.  I guess the best description would be messy.  Yes.  They’re a big, fat mess but well, well worth it.  While testing this recipe I found out several things. 1.  If you eat too many biscuit you’ll get sick of them and never, ever want to eat them again.  At least for a day or two.  2.  If all your ingredients and tools are in place this recipe is infinitely easier.  And 3.  If you are the least bit fussy or persnickety, making these biscuit will most assuredly help you lose that type A mantle we all sometimes wear.  The messy part is when you gently mix together the flour and butter with the buttermilk.  You DON’T want to over mix the dough yet it seems impossible to mix as it all clumps up on your hands.  I’m here to tell you, it’s okay!  When I couldn’t mix the dough anymore because it was stuck like a big, heavy ball on both hands, I squeezed it off each finger, back into the bowl it went and onward I mixed…gently…almost coddling the dough.  After that it was pretty smooth sailing.  Here are some tips I wish I had had prior to baking these nuggets of love.  Believe me when I say, freeze your butter.  You’ll use a box grater to grate it into the flour and you don’t want it  to melt while you grate.  Clear off your counter.  You’re going to need more room that you think.  Do not use parchment paper.  For some reason the bottoms of the biscuits kept browning waaaay too fast when I used it.  I used a large, non-stick, light-colored baking sheet.  Have it out and placed next to the area you plan to roll out the dough.  Generously flour the area where you will be rolling out the dough with all-purpose flour, not self-rising flour, along with your rolling-pin and bench knife if you have one.   If you don’t have a bench knife then grab a sharp chef’s knife.  Keep your flour bag for dusting close at hand.  Have a ruler close by to measure the rolled out dough if you can’t eye-ball it.  I can’t.  I have to measure everything so I keep an old, thin ruler in a kitchen drawer.  It also has all the presidents on it ending with President Clinton so I like to impress myself with all the presidents I’ve forgotten.  Could you identify President A. Johnson?  Didn’t think so.  It’s my favorite as it’s plastic so it can quickly be washed then stored.  I think the last tip would be to move as quickly as you’re able to maintain a cold dough.  Wait, one more tip.  Never twist the bench knife, knife or biscuit cutter while cutting the biscuit dough.  Cut straight up and down and you’ll have lots of pretty layers.   I prepared 3 sweet butters  to serve with the biscuits.  Cinnamon butter which consisted of butter, confectioners sugar and cinnamon.  Blueberry butter made with blueberries, butter and confectioners sugar.  And the last was strawberry butter prepared by finely chopping a few strawberries and mixing them into butter and confectioners sugar.  Add to this breakfast some thickly sliced bacon prepared in the oven for easy clean up,  some spicy Southern sausage, a beautiful, freshly made fruit salad and you are a belle of a hostess!

As I mentioned above I baked these biscuit on a light-colored, non-stick baking sheet.  If a dark-colored baking sheet is used make it a point to keep a close eye on the biscuit bottoms as they will brown much faster.  You might want to consider baking them at 400° so as to avoid rapid browning.  I haven’t tried it with these so I’m not certain what the outcome would be but it is a suggestion.  These biscuit don’t color up much; the tops remain blonde so don’t go by overall color in terms of how done they may be.  I cut this dough into squares in order to have fewer scraps to re-roll.  Feel free to use a round or square biscuit cutter, just make certain it’s sharp.  A soft wheat flour will make all the difference in your biscuit.  White Lily is my all-time favorite but King Arthur and Bob’s Red Mill are perfectly fine.  Try to find buttermilk from a local or small dairy.  Whole Foods has a great one by the name of Lazy Meadows.  It’s whole, not homogenized, non-GMO and from north Georgia.  Good stuff!

Southern Buttermilk Biscuit

  • Servings: 30-35 biscuit
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

  • 5 cups self-rising flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 sticks (8 ounces) salted butter, frozen
  • 2 cups ice-cold buttermilk
  1. Pre-heat oven to 425°.
  2. In a large bowl mix flour and salt.
  3. Using the large holes of a box grater, grate the butter directly over the flour.
  4. Using a pastry cutter or a fork, cut the butter into the flour until the butter is coated with the flour and the butter is in lumps the size of peas and smaller.  If you have naturally cold hands you may use your hands to cut the butter into the flour.  If they’re naturally hot, as are mine, use either the pastry cutter or fork because the heat from your hands will melt the butter.
  5. Make a well in the middle of the bowl and pour in the cold buttermilk.
  6. Using your hands gently mix the ingredients together, scraping the dough off your fingers when you need to.
  7. When the buttermilk is almost incorporated into the flour transfer the dough, with your hands, to a floured board or counter.
  8. Gently fold the dough over and over, maybe 7-8 times, then gently roll out or pat into a 11″X9″ rectangle.
  9. Cut off any rounded edges and set the scraps aside to re-roll if using a square biscuit cutter or cutting the dough with a sharp knife.  If using a round biscuit cutter, cut out the biscuit and set the scraps aside to re-roll.
  10. Place the cut biscuit on a baking sheet, close to each other if you like an all-soft biscuit or 1″-2″ apart if you prefer crispy corners.
  11. Bake 13-15 minutes or until golden on the bottom.
  12. Serve immediately.
  13. To re-heat, warm in a 225° oven for 10-15 minutes.  These biscuit are warm and tender again after re-heating.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

 

Jalapeno Skillet Cornbread Southern style

When I first tried giving James cornbread he was three years old and decidedly not a fan.  I included cheese in the recipe but he was not to be fooled.  All manner of changes were made to the recipe but to no avail.  Then one day I asked, “Jamesy, would you like some Johnny cake?”  Johnny cake is usually baked on a griddle, flat and thin.  I didn’t even have to do that.  I baked up the usual cornbread in my cast iron skillet and he scarfed it down.  He was sold.  My boy had heard the word “cake”.  That’s all it took.  Don’t you wish all eating problems could be solved so easily? James has since grown into a young man who is confident in the kitchen and more than happy to eat Mama’s spicier version of cornbread.  This recipe is roll-your-eyes delicious.  By baking it in a pre-heated iron skillet the bottom of the cornbread becomes crispy and the flavor of the cornmeal is heightened.  I’m fully aware the addition of sugar in cornbread is individual and also more common up North.  However, in the south it’s just not done by us old timers, at least not this one.  Corn is naturally sweet…there’s no need to add sugar.  But scallions and jalapenos are always welcome in cornbread.  It bakes up so beautifully and pairs well with so much.  Can’t have collards without cornbread.  Or chili.  Served with fish chowder or southern BBQ, cornbread is tradition .  Both black eyed peas and tortilla soup demand a healthy wedge.  Quite simply, there’s nothing like cornbread crumbled over a small bowl of cold buttermilk.  Now THAT’S southern!

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Simple, fast and cheap, this recipe will become a family favorite.  Although 1/2 cup of chopped jalapenos seems like a lot, the peppers lose quite a bit of their heat during the baking process.  However, feel free to cut back on them if you’re not crazy about heat or you’re feeding little ones.  If you don’t have a cast iron skillet I suggest you save this recipe until you do have one.  It just won’t crisp up and will be a huge disappointment.  Most importantly, don’t forget to be super careful about grasping the handle of the skillet while moving it in and out of the oven.  It’ll be screaming hot so make sure you have several dry kitchens towels available to make maneuvering easy.

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Jalapeno Skillet Cornbread Southern style

  • Servings: 10-12 wedges
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup jarred jalapeno slices, roughly chopped
  • 1 large bunch (approximately 7-8) scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 cups buttermilk, not reduced fat
  • 2 cups medium ground cornmeal, I like white best but that’s just me
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  1. Pre-heat oven to 425°.
  2. Place the oil in a 10″ cast iron skillet.  Spread the oil all over the pan so that it coats all of the bottom and up the sides.  You can use your fingers, a basting brush or simply swirl the oil all over.
  3. Immediately place the skillet in the pre-heating oven.
  4. In a small bowl combine the chopped jalapeno, scallions, egg and buttermilk.  Mix thoroughly.  Set aside.
  5. In a separate bowl whisk together the cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
  6. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and stir until combined.
  7. USING A HOT MITT OR DRY DISH TOWEL remove the hot skillet from the oven and pour the batter into it.
  8. CAREFULLY return the pan to the oven and bake for 30 minutes.
  9. Allow to cool on a rack for 15-20 minutes prior to  slicing.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

 

Brie, Thyme and Fresh Cranberry Stuffed Bread

I wasn’t planning on serving an appetizer Thanksgiving Day.  The family dinner was at our house this year.  Everyone was in town and coming late in the day.  I couldn’t wait to have all my people gathered together again.  The house was ready, the dining room table glittered.   I wasn’t going to have a starter course because there was going to be so much food… for crying out loud, it’s Thanksgiving!  But then I thought it would be more fun to have a little something to nibble on with champagne and drinks before dinner.  Not wanting to break the bank OR break my back I decided a holiday stuffed bread was in order.  And because my motto is “more is better” I made two.  My husband, Jimmy, looked at me as though I had two heads.  “I know, I know.  It’s a lot of food but if no one eats it, well, we just wrap them up and have them tomorrow.”  He knows not to argue when it comes to food, bless his heart.  Let me just cut to the chase.  When the two loaves had been plated and my nieces began to make their way through the house serving, you have never seen so many faces light up.  My family pounced on them as if they hadn’t eaten in weeks.  Grownups were licking their fingers.  My brother followed the girls with their trays around the house tearing off chunks of warm, cheesy bread and making happy boy sounds.  My son, James,

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was not happy when he saw me tucking fresh cranberries into the cheese but after his first bite was in complete agreement  that the berries were the perfect clean foil against the gooey, richness of the cheese, olive oil and garlic.  Both loaves were gone in minutes.  Minutes!  This recipe is extremely adaptable in that you can substitute the brie for Gruyère, cheddar, mozzarella or the gooey cheese of your choice.  You can tuck in gorgonzola crumbles or shredded parmesan.  Red pepper flakes are wonderful for a little heat.  Not a fan of cranberries?  Try blackberries or raspberries.  I used whole grain boules but white bread would be fine.  Good looking on a table or passed by hand, this starter is perfect for the holidays.  It can be assembled hours ahead, only make certain to wrap it tightly so the bread doesn’t get stale.  Make certain you have plenty of napkins and enjoy!

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Brie, Thyme and Fresh Cranberry Stuffed Bread

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 1-pound boule or round loaf of bread, 6″-7″ diameter works well
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove, grated
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves
  • salt and pepper to taste, a healthy pinch of each will do
  • 1/4 pound brie cheese, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup  shredded Italian 5 cheese, I believe I used Kraft but any brand is fine, store brand or whatever’s on sale
  • 1/2 cup or more fresh cranberries or berry of choice
  • thyme sprigs for garnish, optional
  1. Pre-heat oven to 375°.
  2. Making certain not to cut all the way through to the bottom, slice the bread in roughly half-inch slices.  Turn the bread 90° and make 1/2″ slices, again not cutting all the way through.  I find if I hold the bread firmly it keeps it from shredding or tearing too much.  Set aside.
  3. In a small bowl combine olive oil, garlic, thyme leaves, salt and pepper.  Set aside.
  4. Gently stuff the brie vertically in the bread slices.
  5. Pour half of the olive oil mixture as evenly as you can into the open bread spaces.  Set aside remaining oil.
  6. Toss the thyme leaves with the Italian cheese blend.
  7. Gently stuff the Italian cheese horizontally down into the bread.
  8. Pour the remaining olive oil mixture evenly on the bread.
  9. Tuck the fresh cranberries onto the top of the nooks and crannies of the stuffed bread.
  10. Spray a piece of tin foil with non-stick cooking spray and wrap the bread tightly with the foil.
  11. Place on a baking sheet and bake covered for 25-30 minutes.
  12. Carefully unwrap the bread and bake for 10-15 minutes or until golden and bubbly.
  13. Garnish with fresh thyme sprigs and serve immediately.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Pumpkin Spice Bread with Ginger Cream Cheese Icing

What a week, huh?  And it’s only Tuesday!  I learned a dear, dear cousin of mine in Puerto Rico is sick.  The family here stateside was devastated.  My cousin in Tallahassee and I were in the process of planning a last minute trip to PR, furiously texting back and forth, when suddenly I received not a text but a phone call from her.  She had been pulled out of her grad class and was on her way to the emergency room and would I please say a prayer for her.  Her oldest of three had been hit by a car while riding his bike home.  She knew nothing else of his condition but that.  She heard my voice calm and soothing assuring her my siblings and I would immediately start a prayer circle.  She heard my words of quiet strength and hope.  She could not see my knees buckle with fear nor did she see my eyes fill up with tears.  Hours later I received the text stating he was fine!  His face and hands were all bloodied up.  His glasses were lost and his bike mangled but he was more than okay.  He had worn his protective helmet and it had done its job.  I wanted to do something for them.  I wanted to jump in my little car and 400 miles later show up at her door arms filled with baked goods.  I wanted to wrap her entire family in my arms because family is everything to us.  fullsizeoutput_14d5

And this is what I would have taken.  It’s an easy quick bread that when baking fills your house with the  warm smells of fall.  The smells that make you feel cozy and safe from harm.  Whether you have a slice with a cup of coffee or hot tea or even a glass of milk, this quick bread is satisfying and positively luscious.  I use reduced fat cream cheese in the icing because it’s a bit tangier than whole fat and that tang is more than welcome in the rich frosting.  It also marries quite well with the piquant ginger.  Here’s to hoping the rest of the week is a little easier to handle.  I heard a rumor today’s election day but after last night I can handle this hands down.  Good luck everybody!

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Pumpkin Spice Bread with Ginger Cream Cheese Icing

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin puree
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted and cooled
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.
  2. Cover a 1.5 quart glass loaf pan with cooking spray and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, salt, allspice and nutmeg.  Set aside.
  4. In a separate bowl use a hand mixer to combine pumpkin, eggs, brown sugar, butter, canola oil and vanilla.  Mix until all ingredients are well combined and mixture is smooth.
  5. Pour wet ingredients into dry ingredients and stir by hand until there are no more flour streaks.
  6. Pour batter into prepared loaf pan and bake for 55-60 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  7. Place pan on a cooling rack for 15 minutes then turn bread out of pan and allow to cool completely on cooling rack.

Ginger Cream Cheese Icing

  • 1 8-ounce block cream cheese, I prefer reduced fat, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup butter, room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons ginger paste or finely grated fresh ginger.  Ginger paste is in a tube found in the produce department of your grocery store.
  • 1 cup confectioners sugar, sifted
  1. Using a hand mixer, beat cream cheese, butter and ginger until completely combined.
  2. Add the confectioners sugar and mix until smooth.
  3. When the pumpkin bread has completely cooled mound the icing on top and smooth to your liking.
  4. If you’re not serving the bread for a day or two keep the bread in the refrigerator.  Just prior to serving mix up the icing, top the bread with it and serve.  Or serve the icing dolloped on top of individual slices.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Pumpkin Tres Leches Bread Pudding

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Okay, so I guess I slowly climbed on the pumpkin band wagon.  It’s not the pumpkin flavored coffees at Starbucks.  I can’t stand flavors in my morning coffee…too much like candy and certainly not enough kick.  Nor is it the stand of cinnamon brooms whose scent assaults my olfactory system like a WWII blitzkrieg the moment I step foot in Publix.  No.  It was something as simple as two girl’s weekends, both with girls from college, one was sorority sisters and the other girls that I love.  It got me to thinking about college days.  And Fall.  I went to Mercer University in Macon, Georgia where we had seasons.  That’s where I saw leaves change color for the first time.  I thought how I walked across the beautiful southern campus; orange, yellow and red leaves bouncing and spinning on gusts of wind as if doing cartwheels.  Kind of like sorority sister Anne B. who, drunk and making her way across campus late one night, fell on her face in the middle of a cart-wheel and knocked out her big front tooth.  The whole thing.  Yup.  Serves her right, though.  She was never particularly nice to me plus she had borrowed a very expensive pair of gold earrings and when she finally returned them  to me one had been completely destroyed.  Apparently she had stepped on it.  But she was very, very sorry.  Anyway, where ever she is, she’s running around with a fake front tooth.  Those Autumn nights were chilly for us Florida girls.  In my mind’s eye I can see the wool plaid tweed car coat Daddy had special ordered for me.  A soft, tobacco brown with ebony black and pumpkin gold flecks.  It was sumptuous and luxurious.  Striding across campus to get to class on time, I’d turn the collar up and dig my hands deep into my pockets to stay warm.   In the dorm it was  cozyand comfortable and on weekends music would spill out of our rooms into the halls as we got ready for our dates and went from room to room sharing cocktails before we went out.  Those were the days of albums and turntables.  We listened to everything!  Boz Scaggs, Steely Dan, Marshall Tucker, Allman Brothers, the Eagles, Grinderswitch, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Wet Willie had us singing and dancing like you wouldn’t even believe.  That was our kind of finger poppin’ music.  As I walked out of my dorm with girlfriends or on a date with my boyfriend, you could almost touch the excitement in the darkness, the sensation of anticipation in the frosty, brittle darkness.  Our eyes sparkled from the cold as we laughed, chatted and guzzled booze in the chilly night air.  Fraternity parties were held outdoors on the patio of the lodges.  Mammoth speakers were set up inside and out, as were the kegs and garbage cans filled with grain punch.  More Atlanta Rythym Section, Doobie Brothers and Bachman-Turner Overdrive and Boston.   Lord, I think back and laugh.  Those days celebrated the folly of youth and  the good looks that come with it.  I’ll stop at the risk of divulging any ancient secrets.  But, hey!  Try this way easy bread pudding.  It’s Fall and time for a little pumpkin!

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Pumpkin Tres Leches Bread Pudding

  • Servings: 10-12
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 9 cups dense day  old bread. French, challah and brioche are all excellent
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 5 eggs, well beaten
  • 2 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 5-ounce can evaporated milk
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin, plain
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.
  2. Spray a 9X13 pan with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Cut bread into 1″ cubes and place into the baking pan in an even layer.  Drizzle melted butter over the top.
  4. In a large bowl mix the remaining ingredients well, making certain all ingredients are well mixed.  I use a large whisk.
  5. Pour the egg mixture evenly over the cubed bread.
  6. Press the bread down gently to help soak up the egg mixture.  You can use the back of a mixing spoon.  I’ve even used my hands.
  7. Cover and set aside for 15 minutes so the bread absorbs the egg mixture.
  8. Uncover and bake for 50-60 minutes.  Check for doneness at 50 minutes as the baking time depends on the denseness of the bread.
  9. When the top of the bread springs back after being touched the pudding is done.
  10. It can be served warm or cold as is or drizzled with some cream, caramel or chocolate sauce.  Some toasted pecan pecans are nice sprinkled on top of each serving.  The possibilities are almost endless!

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Honey Butter Dinner Rolls

Why is it no one makes dinner rolls anymore?  I understand the time crunch and lack of energy when you finally get home from work and then have to crank out dinner for the fam but weekends are the perfect time to stock up on these little luxuries that can be stashed away in the freezer to be enjoyed weeks later…maybe some evening when it’s dark, chilly and rainy.  Well, this recipe is one of those kind of keepers.  Soft and fluffy, slathered with warm butter and perhaps a drizzle of that honey you picked up at the farmer’s market, these rolls are a rare treat yet exceptionally easy to make.  They mix and  roll up quickly.  There are two risings but the dough sits quietly in the corner while you go about your business.

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The recipe makes 24 rolls so you’ll have plenty of leftovers to freeze, (and they freeze beautifully), or they can be served at breakfast as is or pulled apart and stuffed with a sausage patty or egg.  The slight sweetness of this bread pairs well with a scoop of homemade chicken salad or spicy crab salad served in the opened middle.  With cooler weather right around the corner consider stocking up on these little golden treasures.  You’ll pat yourself on the back for planning so well!

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Honey Butter Dinner Rolls

  • Difficulty: easy to moderate
  • Print

  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus additional if needed
  • 1 sachet active dry yeast
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted, to brush on before serving
  • 1 tablespoon honey, to brush on before serving
  1. In the bowl of a stand up mixer fitted with  a dough hook combine flour and yeast.
  2. In a small saucepan combine milk, 1/4 cup honey, sugar, 1/4 cup butter and salt, stirring until all ingredients are combined and heated to 105° and 115°.
  3. Add the milk mixture to the flour mixture and beat until just blended.
  4. Add the egg and beat the dough for 3-4 minutes until the dough becomes thick and soft and pulls away from the sides of the bowl.  It will probably be very sticky depending on the humidity in your area.  If the dough is too sticky to handle add one tablespoon of flour to the bowl and beat another minute or so.  If needed add another tablespoon of flour to thicken and continue beating.
  5. Beat the dough until smooth and elastic about 5 minutes.
  6. Place the dough in a greased bowl and turn to grease the top as well.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm corner to rise for 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  8. Lightly spray 2 muffin pans with non-stick cooking spray.
  9. Punch dough down and cut in half with a bench knife or large, sharp knife.  Cover half  of the dough and set aside.
  10. Cut one half of the dough into 12 equal pieces.
  11. Cut each of the 12 pieces into 3 equal pieces, you should have 36 chunks of cut dough.
  12. With your hands gently roll each chunk into a small, fluffy ball and drop three into each muffin cup.
  13. Continue in the same manner with the 2nd half of the dough that was set aside.
  14. Cover both muffin tins and set aside to rise for 45 minutes or until double in size.
  15. Bake in a pre-heated oven for 8-10 minutes or until slightly golden on top.
  16. Remove rolls from the oven and cool for 5 minutes.
  17. Mix the melted butter and tablespoon of honey until well incorporated.  Brush on top of each roll.
  18. Warm any leftovers in a pre-heated 300° oven for 5-7 minutes.

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