7-Up Biscuits, a Southern Classic

It’s Holy week y’all and I’ve got the easiest recipe to fill your Easter brunch biscuit need.  There’s absolutely no kneading and yet, through the miracle of only 4 ingredients, you, too, can have tall, fluffy, gorgeous biscuit.  This is an old recipe, been around for ages, and pretty much a no-fail.  7-Up biscuit are heaven on earth warm out of the oven with a lazy drizzle of honey or slathered with fat dollop of homemade pimento cheese.  Bacon and sausage are also right at home tucked between a freshly split biscuit.  Slightly sweet yet a little salty and way buttery, these babies will have everyone thinking you’re the master baker.  And they’re so pretty!

Some time ago I invested in a six-pack of small 7-Up cans, perfect for this recipe.  These cans are 7.5 ounces, not quite the one cup called for in the recipe but they work great and you’ll never miss that half ounce. I changed a few things in the original recipe to, well, to make the biscuits easy to prepare.  Instead of pouring one stick of melted butter on the bottom of the pan, I divided the butter in half, melted them in the microwave in separate bowls, covered the bottom of a 9X13 quarter sheet with one bowl and finished the biscuit by pouring the remaining butter over the dough prior to popping in the oven.  Also, most recipes call for you to roll out the dough…I can’t even imagine how!  The dough is a heavy, super-sticky mess and it’s not going to have anyone pat, cut or  shape any part of it.  Soooo, I dumped the dough in the middle of the melted butter and gently smoothed it into the corners and sides with the help of a spatula and a spoonula.  The second bowl of melted butter pour over the top of the bowl made the final smoothing down easy-peasy.  You can use salted or unsalted butter in this recipe.  I happen to be a closet salt addict so I’m pretty sure you can figure out which way I went.  Since everyone loves crunchy edges I sprayed a pizza cutter liberally on both sides with non-stick spray and ran the cutter through the dough making 12 3X3-inch biscuit.  I’m telling you it gets no easier and won’t your people be happy when they see your sideboard replete with a lovely, lined basket over flowing with tender, barely sweet, golden biscuit.  Happy Easter!

7-Up Biscuits

  • Servings: 12 3-inch by 3-inch biscuits
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 4 1/2 cups Bisquick pancake & baking mix
  • 1 cup full fat sour cream
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) 7-Up
  • 1/2 cup (one stick) melted butter
  1. Pre-heat oven to 425°. Pour 1/4 cup of the melted butter in the bottom of a 9X13 inch  quarter baking sheet or baking dish.  Spread the butter evenly over the bottom and up the sides making certain not to miss the corners.  Set baking sheet or dish aside.
  2. Measure Bisquick into a large bowl and, using a mixing spoon, break up any large lumps.
  3. Add sour cream and 7-Up and mix thoroughly by hand, making certain to incorporate all the crumbs of baking mix in the bottom of the bowl.
  4. Transfer dough to buttered baking dish and gently spread dough to cover the entire dish.
  5. Pour remaining 1/4 cup of melted butter over the dough and spread the butter evenly.
  6. Spray pizza cutter or knife on both sides with non-stick baking spray and cut dough into the size biscuits you desire.  I like the pizza cutter as it doesn’t scratch my baking sheet.
  7. Bake for 15-17 minutes or until the tops of the biscuit are golden.
  8. Serve straight from the oven or cool for a few minutes then serve.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

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