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Deep South Tomato Pie

The end of tomato season is almost tragic.  Not only is this favorite food lying low for four or five months but it’s an obvious sign that summer is over.  Pools are way too cold to dip a toe in.   Cotton nightgowns have been put away and it’s dark out at 6:00 p.m.  I told a friend it makes me feel like Persephone on her way to the underworld.  I hate you, Hades, and your stupid pomegranate, too!  On the upside we have college ball which I’m crazy about.  Plus this is the time of year when Trader Joe’s carries brussel sprouts on the stalk, figs are in season and one can work out outside and not faint from heat stroke.  Tomatoes, though, are not the sweet, juicy apples of love they were just last month.  It’s okay if the last of the tomatoes just don’t have enough flavor because this is the recipe which will make them sing.  Baked with a generous amount of fresh basil and grated cheeses, this pie is heaven served next to a homemade mixed green salad.  Tomato Pie has been around forever in the South and not only makes wise use of the last-of-the-season fruit but is a perennial favorite at baptisms, first communions, funerals, brunches and pot lucks.  I always make two; one for my house and one to give away or take to one of the aforementioned functions.  The pie needs to be enjoyed relatively soon after baking as the bottom will get soggy if it sits around too long, as with any pie.  It can be re-heated but only in the oven.  Heated in a microwave turns this little jewel into a squishy, wet mess.  It’s super easy to prepare and the crust is merely Bisquick and milk mixed together and patted into your pan.  There’s no ice-cold, cubed butter or rolling out involved.  And everybody loves it.  So when you’re craving some ‘maters but Mother Earth has other ideas, try this recipe out.  It won’t let you down and Fall’s injustices will turn into Autumn’s glories!

 

Deep South Tomato Pie

  • Servings: one 9 inch deep dish pie
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 1/2 cups freshly grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 packed cup fresh basil leaves, stacked, rolled and cut into thin ribbons
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup good mayonnaise, Duke’s or Hellman’s
  • about 2 pounds not-so-ripe tomatoes, peeled, sliced and drained on a thick layer of paper towels.  It’s okay if you don’t quite have the 2 pounds but you don’t want more as the ingredients will over flow when the pie is baked.  We’ve all been there!
  • coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 cups Bisquick
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350° and cover lightly a 9″ pie pan with non-stick spray.  Set aside.
  2. Place cheddar, basil, parmesan and mayonnaise in a medium-sized bowl and mix until completely combined.  Set aside.
  3. While the tomatoes drain on the paper towels, mix the Bisquick with the milk in a medium size bowl until a dough ball has formed.
  4. Dump the dough into the pie pan and lightly grease your hands.  Gently press the dough evenly over the bottom of the dish and all the way up the sides.
  5. Using your fingers or a pastry brush spread the mustard over the pressed pie shell.
  6. Sprinkle tomatoes with the black pepper and layer the tomatoes evenly over the pie shell.
  7. Cover the tomatoes with the cheese mixture and spread evenly.  I find breaking it apart with my hands is easiest.
  8. Bake in the oven for 60-90 minutes until the cheese turns a warm, golden color.
  9. Allow to cool for 10-15 minutes prior to serving to make for easier slicing.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen .com

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Shrimp in a Spicy Coconut Sauce

Sometimes a girl just has to have a big, steaming bowl of lovely Asian-style deliciousness for dinner.  How many times have we made our way home at day’s end after spending 10 hours working… working hard.  To add to our woes often a last-minute run to the grocery store is required if we expect to have dinner.  All of the ingredients for this dish are available at your grocery store and, get this, if you’re so beat you’re willing to take the easy way out, most of the makings called for are already cleaned, prepared and/or cut up.  Yay for grocery store food prep!  I don’t know about you but I’m slow as molasses in the kitchen and that’s on a good day.  So if I can get a little help to speed things up I’ll take it.  The recipe can easily be halved but I like to have leftovers for lunches the following day so take that into consideration.

This dish can be served over noodles, (rice, udon or cellophane are all fine), or it may be served over rice, (white, brown, jasmine or basmati), it all works.  If you’re staying away from carbs altogether add more broth and the dish becomes more soup-like.  Nice, huh?  Most of the vegetables can be found already chopped in the produce section of your grocery store, the shrimp has been cooked and is in the seafood department and the sweet potato can be thrown in the microwave to “bake”.  The sweet potato is SO good paired with the savory lemongrass!  The spinach is tossed into the pan straight from the bag and the basil leaves are torn from the stalk and added without having to cut.  Also, in the produce section, you’ll find tubes of fresh lemongrass, grated ginger paste and minced garlic in the jar.  Oh, the glory of it all!  Wait, wait!  I almost forgot to mention that in the “international” section of the store are already prepared udon noodles in cryovac and, if you prefer glass noodles, just know they don’t have to be cooked.  They soak in hot water for 15-20 minutes so they’re ready when you’ve finished the shrimp part of the recipe.  Can you believe it?  Again, if you’re trying to watch your weight, using “lite” coconut milk is perfectly fine.  I try to have boxed chicken broth always on hand and it’s perfect with the shrimp but feel free to use what you have in the pantry.  Speaking of pantry, the jarred herbs and all-ready-prepared noodles are great staples to stock up on as are a few bags of cleaned shrimp in the freezer, perfect for last-minute soups, salads and stirfrys.  I know this recipe calls for a  lengthy list of ingredients but please keep in mind, this is pretty much a “dump and stir” meal.  I’m thrilled with the ease of it and I know you will be, too.  Enjoy!

Shrimp in a Spicy Coconut Sauce

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 1/4 cup lemongrass paste
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons ginger paste
  • 2 red peppers, chopped
  • 1 1/2 pounds zucchini, sliced
  • 1 6-ounce bag fresh baby spinach
  • 1 handful fresh basil leaves, 1 small box or bunch
  • 2 pounds cooked shrimp, peeled, deveined and shells off
  • 2  13.5-ounce cans unsweetened coconut milk, lite is okay
  • 2 cups seafood, vegetable or chicken broth, boxed is fine
  • 1 medium to large sweet potato, roasted, peeled, cut into 1/4″ cubes
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1-2 red chiles or jalapenos, seeded and finely chopped.  I use 2 as we like heat and spice but feel free to use just one for less spice.  But do use at least one or it won’t be spicy, now will it?
  • salt to taste
  • rice or noodles for serving
  • hot chili garlic sauce, optional, for serving
  1. Over medium-high heat add olive oil to a large, high sided pan.
  2. Add onions and stir until coated with oil and starting to release its perfume.
  3. Add lemongrass, garlic and ginger and thoroughly stir into onions.
  4. Add peppers and zucchini and continue stirring for 2 minutes.
  5. Add spinach and basil and stir until almost completely wilted.
  6. Add shrimp and toss until coated with the pan flavors.
  7. Pour in coconut milk and broth, mix well and raise heat bring to a boil.
  8. Add sweet potato, lime juice and chiles.  Stir.
  9. Taste and add salt if needed.
  10. Serve in large bowls over cooked rice or noodles.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Puerto Rican Salt Cod Fritters – Bacalaitos

In Puerto Rico cod fritters, or bacalaitos, are a quintessential party food.  Wildly popular, these fritters are even sold at the beach.  Right on the sand are wooden shacks with tin roofs, some with a few tables, some only serving take out.  Typically salsa is blasting at full volume while a stiff ocean breeze tempts bathers with the perfume of garlic and culantro.  If you spy a cook working behind her bubbling pot still in her house coat with pink foam curlers in her hair, hips swaying in tune with the music, I strongly suggest you stop there to eat!  I promise you won’t be disappointed.  When I was growing up in Puerto Rico, summers and holidays, these fritters were not often served.  In those days my family was suspicious of any street food and would have been horrified if we had even asked for a bite.  My grandparents felt anything worth ingesting was just as good or better at home.  And that would have been fine except we never had bacalaitos at home.  Why, I don’t know… because they’re bad for you? (They ARE fried!)  Nevertheless, on outings with uncles, aunts and cousins, we were often rewarded for good behavior at the end of day with a little fried something.

Probably the only photograph with Mama and all my siblings at the beach.  It makes me so happy that Mama had on her pearls to go to the beach!

Big doin’s for me when the treat happened to be cod fritters.  I don’t know why they’re called “fritters” as they’re not the shape of, say, apple fritters or conch fritters… they’re not rounded in shape but flat…like a cookie.  Crispy on the outside but tender and chewy on the inside, these “frituras” were served hot out of the fat and wrapped in a paper napkin.  Sometimes, if we happen to be in a really upscale shack, the fritters were loosely wrapped in a napkin then tucked into a small, brown paper bag.  We tossed the napkins and let the paper bag soak up the excess oil while savoring every salty nugget of bacalao, cod, studded throughout the fritter.  Tanned, barefooted and covered with beach sand is how I like to remember enjoying this street food!

 

 

Puerto Rican Cod Fritters

  • Servings: 25 fritters
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

  • 1 pound salt cod, deboned and soaked in cold water 8-12 hours, changing the water several time to get rid of the salt
  • 10 garlic cloves
  • 10-12 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 bunch culantro (approximately .75 ounces) or 20 leaves, ripped into 2″ pieces
  • 2 3/4 cups broth from the cod.  You’ll be boiling the fish briefly so don’t throw the broth out!
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour plus additional if needed
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • vegetable oil
  1. Discard the water the cod has soaked in and place the fish in a pot covered with 1″ of fresh, cold water.  Bring the water to a boil and cook the fish for 10-15 minutes.
  2. Remove the fish from the broth and set aside to cool.  Reserve the broth for later in the recipe.
  3. While the cod is cooling, add the garlic, peppercorns and culantro to a food processor or blender and process until you almost have a paste.  If the ingredients stick and won’t process, add a tablespoon or two of the fish broth and continue processing.
  4. When the cod is cool enough to handle, gently pull the fish apart with your hands.  You want it chunks in your fritters as opposed to a feathery mess.
  5. In a separate large bowl combine the flour and baking powder.
  6. Mix the broth into the flour by hand.  The batter should be the consistency of pancake batter.  If too thin, add a bit more flour.  If too thin, add a little more broth but, in either case, not too much.
  7. To the flour/broth mixture add the flaked cod and the garlic/culantro mixture and mix well by hand.
  8. Allow to sit for 5 minutes or so to let the baking powder do its job.
  9. In a heavy-bottomed frying pan or pot, pour in vegetable oil until it reaches 1″ on the sides.  Heat the oil on high.
  10. When the oil is hot and “shimmers” spoon 1/4 cup into the pan making 3-4 fritters, depending on the size of your pan.  You don”t want to crowd them.  If the fritters are browning too fast drop the heat down to medium-high.
  11. Fry each fritter 3-4 minutes or until golden, turning only once.
  12. Drain the fritters on a paper bag or paper towels.  If you want to be truly authentic, thread each fritter through the middle with a metal skewer and hang across a large pot allowing the oil to drain to the bottom of the pot.
  13. Serve immediately or keep warm in a very low oven.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

Ever wondered why restaurant whole wheat pizza always tastes better?  And why the at-home whole wheat pizza comes out of the oven hard and brittle, stony enough to break off a front tooth?  Well, last night I finally figured it out.  And let me say, the answer is not more olive oil in the dough.  No.  It’s the combination of two things…a little bit of white all-purpose flour mixed into the whole wheat flour and more water than you would think makes sense.  You would have thought I’d have figured this out by now.  I’ve only been making pizza at home for years now but I confess.  Every time I made whole wheat pizza using only whole wheat flour it came out hard as a flat brick.  I strove for a crisp crust with a chewy center while maintaining a relatively healthful dinner.  These pizzas were made palatable with generous toppings of turkey pepperoni, arugula or spinach and the great compromise of 2% reduced fat mozzarella.  Finally I just stopped preparing pizza altogether.  Months and months went by without it being served at our house.  But last night I had a hankering for it and, by gosh, I was going to get it right.  It had been such a long time since I had mixed up the dough that I couldn’t remember the recipe I had cobbled together and, boy, was THAT liberating.  I felt such freedom not having any rules or even any do’s or don’ts to follow.  I had escaped the confines of the culinary box I’d been living in!

I began in the afternoon with a free-flow of ideas and hunches rattling  around my brain.  Two thoughts remained front and center. 1.  White flour is produces a soft and tender product.  2.  Enough water will produce a sticky, floppy dough that won’t dry out.  After a few tries I believe I nailed it.  And the beauty of this dough is it’s so wet and unmanageable it can be mixed in a bowl with a spoon thus eliminating any kneading and messing up of your counter tops.  Life’s small blessings.  In any case, I sure hope you try this recipe out.  Look at it this way, whole wheat flour, turkey pepperoni and greens make for a more healthful pizza which means you can eat it more often!

Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

  • Servings: two 12 inch pizzas
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 package or 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 1/4 cup warm water, tap is fine, no more than 115°
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon honey or agave
  • 1 3/4 cups whole wheat flour, plus additional to flour baking sheet etc.
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • cornmeal
  1. 1 hour prior to baking, pre-heat oven to 500°.
  2. In a large bowl mix all-purpose flour, yeast and warm water.  A wooden spoon works best.  You’ll a few have some lumps of flour but they’ll work their way out when you mix in the whole wheat flour.
  3. Add 3 tablespoons of olive oil and honey/agave to the mixture and combine well.
  4. Add 1 3/4 cups whole wheat flour and salt and mix well until all the lumps are gone.
  5. Cover with plastic wrap, place in a warm corner and allow to rise for 45-60 minutes or until double in size.  Now is a good time to pre-heat your oven.
  6. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and gather the dough into a ball while still in the bowl.  If you don’t have a bench scraper you can cut in half the plastic top of an oatmeal can then cut off the rim or use a butter knife that’s been covered with a bit of olive oil.
  7. Cut the dough in half and using the bench scraper or butter knife, push the sides of each ball of dough into rounds.  To keep the dough from sticking, dust the rounds and bowl with some whole wheat flour using as little as possible.  The wetter the dough, the more chewy the pizza.
  8. Dust your hands and a baking sheet or pizza paddle with a good handful of cornmeal and quickly transfer one dough round to the center of the baking sheet.
  9. Gently pat out the round, moving the round on the cornmeal to avoid it sticking to the baking sheet, until you have an 11″ to 12″ pizza.  If you prefer a thicker crust make the pizza smaller.
  10. Top the pizza with the sauce of your choice then add your toppings.
  11. Bake 15-20 minutes or until the crust is golden brown.
  12. Allow to cool 4-5 minutes before slicing.
  13. Serve immediately.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

A Bacon, Lettuce and Fried Green Tomato Sandwich…the Southern BLT

Although the Tar Heels lost their football game on Saturday, Merritt’s is always a win for a BLT.  Our son, James, went back to UNC this past weekend to visit friends, hang out at the house, catch the game and drop by some of his favorite dives he enjoyed during his college days.  Anyone who went  to UNC knows Merritt’s.  Their BLT’s, pimento cheese and sour dough bread are probably known world wide.  Okay, well, if it’s not known world wide then at the very least it’s wildly popular in mid-state North Carolina.  James took us for lunch during one of our first trips to visit him and we flipped over the place.  Merritt’s stacks generous mounds of bacon strips entangled in a crispy, salty jumble.  Added to the sandwiches are juicy slices of ruby red tomatoes and cold, crunchy leaves of lettuce .  All this is bound together with a liberal slather of good mayonnaise on the bread of your choice.  Our mouths drooled while our eyes were wide open with wonderment.  It was the first of many adventures, culinary and otherwise, we shared with James.  In fact, ALL our weekends with him at UNC were sensational.  Our favorite boy was genuinely excited to see us, a marvelous host and a most fun master of ceremonies.  He introduced us to UNC football and basketball games, Parent’s Weekends for both school and fraternity and all the best restaurants on Franklin Street and in Chapel Hill.  We became acquainted with James’ friends and fraternity brothers, shop keepers, bell hops and waiters .  I look back at those days with such happiness and fondness.   Our son is always loving, thoroughly enjoyable and nonjudgemental even the time when Mama may have skirted the boundaries of proper parental behavior.  Yes, there is one Parent’s Weekend that comes to mind.  His fraternity had a cocktail party at the house Friday night.  They had a band set up in the formal room or big hall, I don’t recall the name of the room and I don’t dare call James at his work and ask because he won’t want me to write this and may become slightly irritated with me soooooo… anyway the boys had several kegs tapped and ready to pour and a myriad of handles out; the pledges had spent the day cleaning so the house sparkled.  Everything seemed to be perfect.  The only hitch was the cocktail party started at 11:00…at night.  Gentle Reader, I am IN THE BED at 9p.m. and, more often than not, lights are out at 10:00.  It was tough staying awake that night but no one was going to call me a party pooper.  Oh, hell no.  I had to keep up and keep up I did.  Drink after drink, before dinner, during dinner, after dinner… honey, time we hit that party this girl was LIT.UP.  James gave us a tour of his room, introduced us to more brothers all the while the band played on, cranking out hit after hit and, of course, we kept on sippin’.  Don’t want to let anybody down.  And what a time we had!  James and I danced to song after song reassuring me he’d have plenty of dances later with his gorgeous date after Daddy and I went back to the hotel.

Shaggin’ the night with away with boysie!

 

What a time we had!  While dancing it occurred to me the band sounded incredibly familiar and it turns out I HAD heard the band, Doug Clark and the Hot Nuts, at some party somewhere when I was in college!  It was positively magical.  Until James walked up and shouted in my ear so only I could hear, and these were his exact words, “It’s time to go home, Mama.  C’mon.  Time to go.”  He told me the following morning at the 9:00a.m. Bloody Mary tailgate he realized it was time for me to go when he looked over and saw I was dancing in the corner by myself.  Ouch, that hurts.  But James, prince that he is, has never made fun of me or thrown it back in my face.  No.  He’s quite aware I may get a bit out of hand every now and again…we all do and there’s just no nice reason to be holier than thou.  But, boy, did we have fun.  And I’ll end this story by adding my husband, Jimmy, has never poked fun at me over this.  Nope.  Not a word.

Probably the first time my Yankee husband ever set foot in a frat house. You have to admit though, we had a pretty good time!

Happy Parent’s Weekend everybody.  Hope all of yours are as splendiferous as ours were.  And I expect all of you to explore the towns where your kids are studying, their friends, suitemates, the town folk and all the foods and customs that go with them!

Bacon Lettuce and Fried Green Tomato Sandwich

  • Servings: 2 large sandwiches
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 4 slices bread of your choice, toasting optional
  • 1/2 cup good quality mayonnaise
  • 1-2 tablespoons Sriracha or hot chili sauce of your choice
  • 4 thick, fried green tomato slices.  If you need a recipe type “fried green tomatoes” in the upper right search box.
  • bib lettuce leaves, washed, dried and stem taken out
  • 5 slices thick cut bacon already cooked
  • freshly ground black pepper
  1. Lay out bread slices.
  2. In a small bowl mix mayonnaise and chili sauce until completely mixed.  Add additional chili sauce to taste.
  3. Divide evenly and spread mayo-chili sauce mixture on one side of each slice of bread.
  4. Place one tomato slice on two of the four slices of bread.
  5. Break bacon slices in half, vertically, and arrange 5 pieces on top of the tomato slices.
  6. Carefully place lettuce over the bacon.
  7. Top the lettuce with another slice of tomato and dust with black pepper.
  8. Place the remaining bacon on top of the tomato slice and top that with the second slice of bread.
  9. Gently press down when slicing in half.
  10. Serve immediately.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Classic Toffee Oatmeal Cookies

It’s Fall and I’m back!  Without explaining my absence let’s just say this past year has been…hmmm…I’ll be positive about it and say it’s been a year of growth.  Fall on your knees and cry out kind of growth.  Ugh.  I despise the process  but I’m pretty sure it’s made me a much stronger and better person.  That said let’s get on with Fall!  The weather FINALLY turned last night and Fort Lauderdale woke up to a cool, crisp 57°.  Here in SoFlo that’s fireplace weather.  This sweet treat is just the ticket with a cup of hot coffee or tea or a cold glass of milk.  These cookies are ridiculously easy to make and will fly out of your house.  I’ve also baked them with coconut chips and raisins.  Yes, they can be made with chocolate chips and I suppose they’re good but I’m not a big fan of chocolate chips in my cookies.  Call me crazy, I don’t care.  These cookies, however, are chewy and rich…the buttery toffee bits complement the oatmeal perfectly.  The cookies travel well, whether in a lunch box or through the mail to your favorite college student.  I hope you enjoy them!

Classic Toffee Oatmeal Cookies

  • Servings: 40 cookies
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup shortening
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, firmly packed
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 cup toffee bits, found on the baking aisle of your grocery store
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups uncooked old fashioned oats
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.  Line your baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl cream together the butter, shortening and sugars.
  3. To the bowl add the eggs and vanilla extract and mix well until completely blended.
  4. In a medium size bowl add the  flour, toffee bits, cinnamon, baking soda and salt.  Mix well.
  5. To the flour mixture add the oats and mix until completely combined.
  6. Add the flour mixture to the butter-egg mixture and, by hand, mix well until all the oats are completely coated and all the ingredients are well combined.
  7. Using a 1 1/2 inch melon baller, scoop the cookie batter evenly onto the parchment paper lined baking sheets leaving 2 1/2″-3″ between cookies.
  8. Bake 8-10 minutes.  The cookies will still be undercooked in the middle.  They will firm up as they cool.
  9. Cool the baking sheets on racks.
  10. To store allow to cool completely then pack the cookies in an airtight container.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com

Roasted Sweet Potato, Parsley and Gorgonzola Salad

Anyone down here in south Florida will agree, we have morphed from the cool sweetness of spring to the sweltering heat of summer.  Now is the time I send my husband out to the grill with a tray heaped on one side with marinated flank steak, boneless chicken breasts or thick tuna steaks.  The other half of the tray is covered with skewered grape tomatoes, corn rubbed with olive oil, salt and cayenne pepper and red pepper wedges also drizzled with olive oil.  My contribution to this meal is prepared in the conditioned air comfort of my kitchen.  Roasted sweet potato, parsley and gorgonzola salad is ideal for summer dinners as it can be prepared the night before serving or in the morning when the temperature has not begun its intolerable climb.  This salad is cool and light yet has heft.  You will not feel hunger pangs an hour or two after eating it.  Oh, no.  Not with this salad.

It marries well with grilled and/or spicy flavors…especially spicy heat.  The sweet potatoes tame the flames of cayenne, harissa, serrano and scotch bonnet.  I’m crazy about the clean, lemony flavor the parsley leaves impart.  Aside from being good-looking, the green leaves cut through the richness of the sweet potatoes and gorgonzola with a cleansing, citrusy flavor.  It also travels well making it a favorite for picnics at the beach, concerts in the park or poolside dinners while we’re wrapped in cotton towels heavy with dampness and enjoy those last rays of sunlight at 8:00 at night.  Take it outside and enjoy the beginning of summer!

Roasted Sweet Potato, Parsley and Gorgonzola Salad

  • Servings: 8-10
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Dressing:

  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 4 small garlic cloves
  • salt and pepper to your liking
  1. Place olive oil, vinegar and garlic into a bender, magic bullet or mini food processor and process until smooth.
  2. Taste for salt and pepper and add to your liking.
  3. Chill until serving.

Salad:

  • 2 1/2 pounds sweet potatoes, that’s about 5 large potatoes
  • 2 small sweet onions, thinly sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 5 ounces Gorgonzola or blue cheese, crumbled
  • 1 bunch flat leaf parsley, leaves only
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.  Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. Cut potatoes into 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch pieces and place in a large bowl.
  3. Add the onions, salt and pepper and olive oil to bowl and toss well with your hands until the potatoes and onions are completely covered with the oil, salt and pepper.
  4. Transfer the potato mixture to the baking sheet, spreading to make an even layer.
  5. Roast for 45 minutes or until fork tender.
  6. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely.
  7. Chill until ready to serve.
  8. To serve add the gorgonzola cheese and parsley leaves to the salad.
  9. Drizzle 1/2 cup dressing over the salad and, very gently, toss to combine being careful not to smash the potatoes.
  10. If the salad needs more dressing, add one tablespoon at a time, gently tossing until thoroughly mixed.
  11. Taste for salt and pepper.

http://www.theirreverentkitchen.com