Tag Archives: tomatoes

Deep South Tomato Pie

The end of tomato season is almost tragic.  Not only is this favorite food lying low for four or five months but it’s an obvious sign that summer is over.  Pools are way too cold to dip a toe in.   Cotton nightgowns have been put away and it’s dark out at 6:00 p.m.  I told a friend it makes me feel like Persephone on her way to the underworld.  I hate you, Hades, and your stupid pomegranate, too!  On the upside we have college ball which I’m crazy about.  Plus this is the time of year when Trader Joe’s carries brussel sprouts on the stalk, figs are in season and one can work out outside and not faint from heat stroke.  Tomatoes, though, are not the sweet, juicy apples of love they were just last month.  It’s okay if the last of the tomatoes just don’t have enough flavor because this is the recipe which will make them sing.  Baked with a generous amount of fresh basil and grated cheeses, this pie is heaven served next to a homemade mixed green salad.  Tomato Pie has been around forever in the South and not only makes wise use of the last-of-the-season fruit but is a perennial favorite at baptisms, first communions, funerals, brunches and pot lucks.  I always make two; one for my house and one to give away or take to one of the aforementioned functions.  The pie needs to be enjoyed relatively soon after baking as the bottom will get soggy if it sits around too long, as with any pie.  It can be re-heated but only in the oven.  Heated in a microwave turns this little jewel into a squishy, wet mess.  It’s super easy to prepare and the crust is merely Bisquick and milk mixed together and patted into your pan.  There’s no ice-cold, cubed butter or rolling out involved.  And everybody loves it.  So when you’re craving some ‘maters but Mother Earth has other ideas, try this recipe out.  It won’t let you down and Fall’s injustices will turn into Autumn’s glories!

 

Deep South Tomato Pie

  • Servings: one 9 inch deep dish pie
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 1 1/2 cups freshly grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 packed cup fresh basil leaves, stacked, rolled and cut into thin ribbons
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup good mayonnaise, Duke’s or Hellman’s
  • about 2 pounds not-so-ripe tomatoes, peeled, sliced and drained on a thick layer of paper towels.  It’s okay if you don’t quite have the 2 pounds but you don’t want more as the ingredients will over flow when the pie is baked.  We’ve all been there!
  • coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 cups Bisquick
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350° and cover lightly a 9″ pie pan with non-stick spray.  Set aside.
  2. Place cheddar, basil, parmesan and mayonnaise in a medium-sized bowl and mix until completely combined.  Set aside.
  3. While the tomatoes drain on the paper towels, mix the Bisquick with the milk in a medium size bowl until a dough ball has formed.
  4. Dump the dough into the pie pan and lightly grease your hands.  Gently press the dough evenly over the bottom of the dish and all the way up the sides.
  5. Using your fingers or a pastry brush spread the mustard over the pressed pie shell.
  6. Sprinkle tomatoes with the black pepper and layer the tomatoes evenly over the pie shell.
  7. Cover the tomatoes with the cheese mixture and spread evenly.  I find breaking it apart with my hands is easiest.
  8. Bake in the oven for 60-90 minutes until the cheese turns a warm, golden color.
  9. Allow to cool for 10-15 minutes prior to serving to make for easier slicing.

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Sausage, Tomato and Basil Spaghetti Squash Bake

Did you indulge or party just a tee-tiny bit too much this past weekend?  Or maybe you fell for that lie we all tell ourselves when we’ve eaten half the brownies and, thoroughly disgusted with ourselves, take action to rid the temptation by saying, “I want this out of the house.  I’ll finish it and then it won’t be around anymore to tease me.”  It’s so awful.  And hard, too.  But I’ve found if I can stick to a healthful meal plan for two or three days eating well almost becomes a habit.  All of us have struggled with our weight at one time or another.  College weight, baby weight and old lady weight have all been my personal nightmares.  Here’s a special memory that ought to make you feel better.  When I was pregnant with our son, James, I gained 52 (yes, 52) pounds.  I was enormous; I looked like a walrus…except I had braces and a real tragedy of a haircut.  After I gave birth I was still fat but I had the greatest treasure in the world.  Anyway, one afternoon my father came over…alone.  Normally he and Mom came over together or Mom came alone.  We didn’t really have what one would call a “visit”, as he strode with his long legs into our house and made the following announcement.  “Your mother and I are terribly worried.  So I’m only going to say this once.  Lose the weight.”  With that, he turned around and walked out.  Nice, huh?  Thanks, Daddy.  I can’t say his little pep talk worked, what with a new baby and nursing and all; it took a while after that to “lose the weight”.  But these are the types of meals that make dropping a few pounds somewhat easier.  We can do this.  We’ve all lost weight before and we’ll do it again.  With a little planning we can be healthy about it and keep the weight off.  Fingers crossed.

I love this dish!  It is incredibly satisfying and as filling as a pasta dish but without the sluggish, weighted down feeling one is left with after sitting down to a huge bowl of penne, fettucine or farfalle…not to mention the guilt, smothering like the black cloud we all know it to be.  This casserole doubles extremely well, baked in a 9″ x 13″ dish.  I typically double the recipe as my entire household enjoys it for lunch the following day, along with a good bit set aside for my brother and father.  More fresh basil may be added if you like, as well as more grape tomatoes.  The tomatoes bake-off beautifully, warm and savory, they almost melt in your mouth.  The recipe doesn’t call for much parmesan cheese but if you want to stay Paleo or keep the calories out just leave it off.  Truly, with all the different flavors, this dish doesn’t need it.  Enjoy!

Sausage, Tomato and Basil Spaghetti Squash Bake

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 4 cups roasted spaghetti squash, that’s about one large squash
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/4 pounds Italian style turkey sausage
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 medium zucchini, grated using the large holes of a box grater
  •  1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 cup crushed tomatoes
  • 2 pints grape tomatoes
  • 1 cup fresh basil leaves, torn by hand
  • 1/2 cup fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
  1. Pre-heat oven to 375°.  Cover an 8″ x 11″ baking dish with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.
  2. With a large spoon scoop the spaghetti squash flesh out of the shell and into a large bowl.  Set aside.
  3. Pour half of the olive oil into a large skillet, heat to medium and swirl the olive oil fully covering the bottom and sides of the pan.
  4. Add the whole sausage links to the pan and cook over medium until browned all over.
  5. Leaving the juices in the pan, transfer the sausage to a bowl and let cool.
  6. Add the remaining olive oil, onion and garlic to the pan, stirring well to get up all the bits of sausage.
  7. When the onion begins to turn clear, add the zucchini and oregano and stir well.
  8. Add the crushed tomatoes, stir well and remove from heat.
  9. Transfer the vegetable mixture to the bowl of spaghetti squash.
  10. To the bowl add the grape tomatoes, basil and parsley and toss well to thoroughly combine.
  11. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust seasonings if needed.
  12. Transfer mixture to baking dish and, if using parmesan, scatter the cheese evenly over the top of the casserole.
  13. Bake 25-30 minutes or until the grape tomatoes become soft to the touch.

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Heirloom Tomato, Feta and Lemon Thyme Salad

I hate saying goodbye to friends.  I loathe it.  It saddens me beyond measure.  But that ‘s what I did this past Tuesday.  Over coffee my friend, Craig, and I caught up with each other after not seeing each other for a good three or four years.  We kept in touch every now and again through Facebook.  Craig is a professional chef on yachts…yachts that cater to A-list movie stars.  The opposite of that penny-ante galley position I accepted for one summer in the Abacos.  Regardless, I look at his life as one big, fat adventure.  We chuckled over adventures gone wrong, shared and  rejoiced culinary triumphs and discoveries.  Both of us had lost close friends and understood the encompassing heartache and profound loss.  He announced he’s trading palms for pines.  Turns out Craig is moving to the Pacific Northwest.  And although I don’t see him often enough and may not ever see him again, I rejoice in his leap for the good in life, his optimistic outlook towards life situations.  We’ll continue laboring to recognize goodwill, tolerance, charity and beauty in the darker corners of our personal worlds no matter the struggle.  That said, I will miss him.  He left me with happiness, a bag of his homegrown tomatoes and a fabulously simple recipe.  I share that with you.

I don’t include specific amounts of ingredients in this salad as it can be made as small or as large as you wish.  As with all simple recipes the quality of your ingredients is paramount.  If you try to cut corners or even leave out a component, the recipe will be compromised.  When the outcome is less than perfect or an utter disappointment you’ll know why.  French thyme, whether fresh or dried, will not yield the same results.  It must be lemon thyme.  If you can’t find it in the produce department at the grocery store most likely you can pick up a pot at your nursery or gardening center.  It’s well worth the trip!  This salad is best served at room temperature.  Any bits left over are fabulous the following day tucked into an omelette.  And the dressing is like liquid sunshine drizzled over a mixed green salad, boiled new potatoes, asparagus or roasted chicken.  Imagine it on grilled shrimp or mahi.  The possibilities are without end.  Enjoy!

Heirloom Tomato, Feta and Lemon Thyme Salad

  • Servings: amount made
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • Meyer lemons or regular lemons if Meyers are not available in your area
  • good olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • heirloom tomatoes
  • Greek feta cheese
  • fresh lemon thyme
  1. Pour equal amounts of fresh lemon juice and olive oil into a glass jar with a lid.
  2. Add salt and pepper to taste, cover tightly with the lid and shake vigorously.
  3. Refrigerate until ready to use.
  4. Slice tomatoes and arrange on serving dish.
  5. Crumble the feta cheese by hand and scatter generously over the tomato slices.
  6. Sprinkle fresh lemon thyme leaves over salad.  Garnish with a few sprigs of the lemon thyme.
  7. Shake salad dressing to mix well then spoon over salad.
  8. Adjust salt and pepper to taste and serve.

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Fresh Tomato and Pesto Spaghetti Squash

Here we are in March…in like a lion, out like a lamb.  In south Florida we are most definitely enjoying lamb-like weather.  Jimmy and I are found in the courtyard often, reading and writing, the dog typically sprawled at our feet.  Jimmy will spend his mornings outside working on his laptop, leisurely smoking his pipe which, by the way, smells positively heavenly.  We read the New York Times in the morning and take pleasure in a simple happy hour or dinner in the evening.  Clearly the mosquitos haven’t found our house yet…but they will.  In the meantime, if it’s morning or evening, assume we’re puttering outside.  This dish is a spring and summer joy.  Simple and healthful, it may be served as a vegetable side dish or as an entree with a piece of grilled tuna or chicken atop.  It’s lovely at a picnic or poolside as it travels extremely well.  Spaghetti squash is much lighter than pasta and undeniably lower in calories.  Those who are allergic to wheat will love this alternative.  No more sneezing and itchy eye!  Regardless of your reason to try this dish, I think you’ll truly enjoy it and so will your family.

Fresh Tomato and Pesto Spaghetti Squash

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 2 spaghetti squash, medium size
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2 pints grape tomatoes
  • 1 1/2-2 cups fresh basil leaves plus a few sprigs for garnish
  • 1 7-ounce container of store-bought pesto or approximately 1 cup of homemade, I use store-bought, reduced fat
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese. This is completely optional and may be left out for a dairy-free, vegan or paleo dish.  It’s still absolutely delicious.
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Pre-heat oven to 400°.  Line a large baking sheet with tin foil and cover foil lightly with non-stick baking spray.  Set aside.
  2. Cut both squashes in half lengthwise.
  3. Using a large, metal spoon, scoop out all the seeds from the squashes.  Discard the seeds.
  4. Place the squashes cut side down on the baking sheet and bake for 45-60 minutes or until the flesh is fork tender.  I check them at 45 minutes and return to the oven checking for doneness every 5 minutes or so.
  5. While the squashes are baking finely mince the garlic and place in a medium size, non-reactive bowl.  I use glass.
  6. Cut the tomatoes in half and add them to the garlic.
  7. Using your hands, rip the fresh basil into small, bite size pieces and add them to the garlic-tomato mixture.
  8. Add the pesto and olive oil to the tomato mixture.  If using parmesan cheese, add it as well.  Mix thoroughly so all ingredients are well combined.
  9. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside until the squashes have baked.
  10. Remove the squashes from the oven and allow to cool for 10-15 minutes or until they’re easy to handle.
  11. With a small paring knife cut the flesh of the squashes lengthwise down to the shell being careful not to cut through to your hand, making 3 or 4 parallel cuts, each cut about 3/4″-1″ apart.  This allows bite size pieces and makes it easier to assemble the dish.
  12. With a large, metal spoon scoop the flesh out of the squashes and place into a large bowl.
  13. Pour the tomato-pesto mixture over the squash and gently toss until all the squash is well coated.
  14. Transfer to a serving platter and garnish with any fresh basil leaves and serve.
  15. If serving within a few hours the bowl may be covered with plastic wrap and then transferred to the serving platter right before serving.

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Herb Roasted Tomatoes

Roasted tomatoes seem to always be lurking in my kitchen.  I use them in soups, tuck them into panini and top them on bruschetta.  They are both sweet and savory and can be used in a myriad of dishes.  The beauty of this recipe is your tomatoes don’t have to be ripe to end up with gorgeous roasted ‘maters.  My experience with grocery store tomatoes, and sometimes even the ones purchased at farmer’s markets, is a usually a huge disappointment.  No flavor and a dry, mealy texture is the norm today.  This recipe forgives the gassed tomato and the farmer that dared tout his product as “vine ripe from the farm”.  Let me make clear though, nothing, but nothing, will save the rock hard, pale pink fruit if it is carted to market before it’s time.

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But your average grocery store tomato will sing when prepared this way.  I serve it as a side along side other vegetable dishes and my family is happy, happy.  Any leftovers are roughly chopped and made into soup or bruschetta.  The flavors ripen with a bit of time so the following day these roasted tomatoes are sublime…warm, hot or cold.  They’re great on homemade pizza, in omelets and salads.  Juicy and full of flavor, they pair well with grilled beef and fish, as well as grilled zucchini and stuffed into grilled portobello mushrooms.  Over pasta?  You’ll think you died and went to heaven.  I hope you try these.  So good and so easy!

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Herb Roasted Tomatoes

  • Servings: 6-8 as a side
  • Difficulty: easy
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  • 12 plum tomatoes
  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon dried thyme or herbes of provence
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 5 or 6 fresh thyme sprigs
  1. Pre-heat oven to 400°.
  2. Slice tomatoes lengthwise in half, slice out the core if you wish.  I leave it as it softens and sweetens as it roasts.
  3. Hold one half over the sink, cut side up and run your index finger through the tomato sections, scooping out and discarding the seeds and finish by placing in a large bowl.  Continue until all the tomato halves have been seeded.  Set aside.
  4.  In a small bowl combine garlic, thyme, salt and pepper and olive oil and mix well.
  5. Pour the garlic mixture over the seeded tomatoes and, using your hands, toss well making certain the garlic and herbs cover all surfaces of the seeded tomatoes.
  6. Line a rimmed baking sheet with tin foil and cover with non-stick spray.
  7. Place the tomatoes cut side up on the baking sheet.  Pour any garlic-olive oil mixture over the tomato halves and scatter the fresh thyme sprigs randomly over the tomatoes.
  8. Bake 45-55 minutes.
  9. Serve immediately or cool completely, store in an airtight container and refrigerate.

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1 Hour Mediterranean Chicken, the midweek save

This is my new go-to, middle of the week, what the heck am I gonna feed ’em dinner.  I love to cook, yes, but often I feel irritated and uninspired and just plain resentful that, once again, I’M in charge of dinner.  Want to blow those dark feelings away?  Well, here’s my solution.  Mediterranean Chicken.  My boys love, love, love it.  We’ve had it maybe four times in the past week and a half and they are thrilled  every single time.  They hang over the pan, big, sad eyes wanting a taste.  Every time I hear another story, “I just need a little taste to tide me over.”  Or “Mama!  Please!  I never had lunch!”.  I love it.  And Lawdy, it is one easy recipe; most ingredients are probably lounging in your pantry waiting to be used.  Redolent with the flavors of the Mediterranean, this dish is ready from start to finish in about  one hour.  Other ingredients may be added such as olives and capers but I tend to stay away from adding more ingredients with strong flavors as they take over and obliterate the more subtle notes of artichoke and lemon.

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Mediterranean Chicken is heavenly served over noodles, mashed potatoes or rice and, my favorites, roasted spaghetti squash or mashed boniato, a kind of white sweet potato loved by Hispanics.  This dish is perfect for all you gravy lovers and delicious the following day.  Another quick dinner is to serve it with a few bags of fresh spinach sautéed with garlic, seared asparagus and hot, crunchy bread.  Enjoy!

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Mediterranean Chicken

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 1/2 packed cup sun-dried tomatoes, dried not in oil, chopped
  • 5 garlic cloves, finely grated or minced
  • grated zest of one lemon
  • 1 8.5 ounce can artichoke heart, drained, moisture squeezed out and roughly chopped
  • 1 1/3 cups white wine, chicken broth or water
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. Pour olive oil into a large, high sided frying pan and heat over medium to medium high heat.
  2. Salt and pepper chicken thighs and place all of them “skin” side down.  Do not spread open the chicken.  They’re best bunched up as they are packaged.
  3. When chicken has browned turn all the pieces over to the other side, the side where the bone was.
  4. When the bone side of the chicken has browned remove to a bowl and set aside.
  5. To the pan juices add the onion, garlic and chopped sun-dried tomatoes and stir until well combined.
  6. When the onion is clear add the grated lemon and artichoke hearts and stir well.  Pour in the wine, broth or water.  I’ve even done combinations of the three when I didn’t have much on hand.  It all comes out great.
  7. Return thighs to the pan, moving the onion artichoke mixture around and spooning it over all the chicken.
  8. Cover and lower to a simmer.  Cook the chicken over low heat for 30 minutes or until fork tender.

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Roasted Vegetable Greek Stew…Tourlou Tourlou

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After a weekend of pizza, steaks, casseroles heavy with cheese and dinners out, Meatless Monday sure does creep up fast.  The entire family, that would be the three of us!, worked at the Greek festival all weekend so when the week started, needless to say, the cupboards were bare.  And after grabbing a bite here and there of pita and hummus, flaming Greek cheese and sausage, baklava, feta fries and tender bits of lamb, a clean but healthful dinner was desperately needed.  When I say “clean” I mean little or no dairy, no heavy sauces and no frying.  Clean eating doesn’t sentence one to a lifetime of salads.  On the contrary, the Greek diet is mostly plant-based but the beauty is the brilliant twist the Greeks give their vegetables.  A stick of cinnamon thrown in here, a squeeze of fresh lemon there, elevate the humble dishes to celebrity status.  Smoky, roasted eggplant can be fused with walnuts, garlic and lemon juice yielding a creamy dip that will knock your socks off.  What I love about this dish of stewed, roasted vegetable is you don’t need to really follow the recipe.  There is a long, and I mean loooong, list of ingredients that work together magnificently and still offer a rib-sticking meal.  Most of the vegetables are interchangeable so feel free to throw in a bag of green beans if you’re out of zucchini.  Canned whole tomatoes are fine if you have no fresh ones.  When I prepared this dish this week I had forgotten fresh mint, dill and flat leaf parsley at the grocery store.  We’re in high season here in South Florida.  Every tourist and his brother is out joy ridin’ and if you think I was going out in that snarl of 5:00 traffic you’ve got another thing coming.  And I LOVE fresh mint in my Tourlou.  I had on hand, though, dried dill and a big ol’ bush of oregano.  This is also the ideal dish for out of season vegetables such as tomatoes.  Roasting them brings out flavors the tomatoes didn’t even know they had.

Oh, the magic these vegetables will make after an olive oil bath and a little time in the oven!
Oh, the magic these vegetables will make after an olive oil bath and a little time in the oven!
Almost there. Another 30 minutes and this will be a melt-in-your-mouth triumph.
Almost there. Another 30 minutes and this will be a melt-in-your-mouth triumph.

Roasted Vegetable Greek Stew or Tourlou Tourlou

If you want to be creative this is the recipe for you.  My recipe is just a guideline and what works for me.  Mushrooms, peas…I guess the point I’m trying to make is roast whichever vegetables you enjoy.  My vegetable stew came out positively gorgeous, I mean, just look at the photos!  It was warm and satisfying, so good in fact, I didn’t even want the usual topping of crumbled Greek feta cheese.  I served the dish with a chunk of crusty French bread, absolutely necessary to sop up the exquisite bend of juices from the onions, garlic, tomatoes and olive oil.  And although it may be juvenile and straight out of the nursery, I’m 100% guilty of using my fork to crush a few random pieces of potato to then mix in the fragrant olive oil and juices.  Oh, yes!  Heaven on a plate.

  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 large onion, halved and sliced
  • 1 large head garlic, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large bell pepper, halved and cut into strips
  • 1 large eggplant, cut into 1 1/2″ pieces
  • 1 1/2 pounds zucchini, cut into 1/2″ rounds
  • 4 carrots, cut into 1/4″ rounds
  • 3 pounds tomatoes, each tomato cut into eighths
  • 2 pounds potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/2″ pieces
  • 1/2 cup fresh mint, leaves chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh dill, chopped or 1 heaping tablespoon dried
  • 1 cup flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon each salt and pepper
  • Greek feta cheese, crumbled, optional
  1. Pre-heat oven to 350°.
  2. Cover an extra-large roasting pan or casserole dish with non-stick cooking spray making certain to cover all of the bottom and sides of the pan.
  3. If your roasting vessel is glass or not stove-top safe, use a pan for this next step.  If your roasting pan is metal and stove top safe the entire dish maybe prepared in the roasting pan.  Heat the olive oil over medium heat in the roasting pan or skillet.
  4. Add the onion slices cook until soft, stirring often.
  5. Add the garlic and continue stirring.  Take care that the garlic doesn’t burn.  If using a pan transfer this mixture to the sprayed roasting dish.  If onion mixture cooked in the roasting pan, turn off heat but leave stove top.
  6. Add all remaining ingredients except feta cheese, stirring between additions.  Make certain all ingredients are evenly coated with olive oil, herbs, salt and pepper and any pan juices.
  7. Cover tightly with tin foil and bake for one hour.
  8. Carefully remove tin foil, stir vegetables and continue to bake uncovered for 30 minutes.
  9. Remove from oven and allow to cool 5 minutes.
  10. If using feta cheese scatter one or two tablespoons over each plate.
  11. Serve with crunchy bread.